Kul­preet Ya­dav

KER­ALA FLOODS: A TRAGEDY IN GOD'S OWN COUN­TRY

Storizen Magazine - - Front Page - by Pria

Spe­cial Is­sue to con­vey grat­i­tude and hope­ful­ness

We stand with the peo­ple of Ker­ala

AN EX­CLU­SIVE IN­TER­VIEW

A multi-faceted per­son­al­ity, IIM Indore and IIM Luc­know Alumni, Ex-Naval Of­fi­cer (served 2 decades) and au­thor of seven books, Kul­preet Ya­dav

talks with Pria to share his jour­ney. You have writ­ten 7 books to date, which one is clos­est to you and why? The Andy Karan series and the Vicks Menon thriller. That’s the hon­est an­swer. Be­cause by the time I wrote them, my skills as a writer had con­sid­er­ably evolved. As you would agree, writ­ing is a jour­ney and like in any jour­ney, the trav­eler gets smarter with ex­pe­ri­ence. To put things in a clearer per­spec­tive, I would like to say that these are bet­ter writ­ten as com­pared to the ones I had writ­ten ear­lier. My ini­tial books, I now know, were rough and im­ma­ture in parts. Not­with­stand­ing that, I will al­ways be proud of my first book, The Bet (Frog books, 2006).

On a cold De­cem­ber morn­ing, a white woman is found mur­dered in a cheap ho­tel in Pa­har­ganj, New Delhi. Vicks Menon, an out-of-work jour­nal­ist, is tipped off by the ho­tel’s re­cep­tion­ist and is the first to ar­rive at the crime scene, where he dis­cov­ers a lead. It’s the bus ticket used by the dead woman two days ear­lier. But Vicks is bat­tling per­sonal trou­ble. He has no money, an al­co­hol prob­lem, and a nearly bro­ken re­la­tion­ship with Tonya, his es­tranged live-in part­ner, a clin­i­cal psy­chol­o­gist who spe­cial­izes in pro­fil­ing hard­ened crim­i­nals.

Praise for Kul­preet Ya­dav’s thrillers: ‘The fast-paced nar­ra­tive and sus­pense­filled plot are com­po­nents that make the book read like a movie script.’

-The Times of In­dia

‘A bril­liant thriller’

- Hin­dus­tan Times

‘High-oc­tane thriller’

-The Asian Age

It was a raw ef­fort, edited poorly, and there were flaws in the writ­ing which I can see now, and yet this was the book that laid a foun­da­tion for my jour­ney. With­out The Bet, I wouldn’t have come this far. Ten years into the fu­ture, I might be say­ing the same things about the Andy Karan series, or the Vicks Menon thriller for that mat­ter... to cut the long story short, I think we fall in love with our work, then fall out of it, be­fore fall­ing in love all over again as soon as we re­al­ize that they were the rea­sons that gave mo­men­tum to our jour­ney. What mo­ti­vates you to write the books in thriller/sus­pense genre? Any life ex­pe­ri­ences, ob­ser­va­tions, etc? As a per­son, I pre­fer speed, color, and ex­cite­ment and when I try to cap­ture sto­ries with these fla­vors, it not just in­ten­si­fies my own ex­pe­ri­ences but also gives birth to a book that’s high on ac­tion and thrill. As an of­fi­cer, and while in con­trol of the three ships that I had the honor of com­mand­ing, I lead my crew in some very thrilling anti-smug­gling, anti-piracy, and anti-poach­ing op­er­a­tions at sea. Guns, speed, high-adrenalin chases were all in­gre­di­ents of my ev­ery­day life and I think some of it in­vari­ably spills into the books I write. Be­sides that, I have grown up read­ing thrillers. By the time I had fin­ished my col­lege, I had read more than a hun­dred thrillers of all kinds.

I have grown up read­ing thrillers. By the time I had fin­ished my

col­lege, I had read more than hun­dred thrillers of all kinds.

Yes, I have had my own share of ups and downs. But I refuse to get in­tim­i­dated with fail­ure. For me, fail­ure just makes the taste of suc­cess that much sweeter.

"Fight all that you can, but re­mem­ber, not all fights are meant to be won." Very wisely said! Can you elab­o­rate this view­point in your own words? Any past or present strug­gles you went through and want to share with us?

Yeah that’s my quote and I stand by it. What I mean is, pre­pare hard, don’t fall, and give in your best. But due to any rea­son, if you end up on the los­ing side, don’t just give up. Pre­pare again, train harder, and fight bet­ter. Win­ning should be our aim, but ac­cept­ing de­feat and learn­ing from it, is what makes us a real win­ner.

Yes, I have had my own share of ups and downs. But I refuse to get in­tim­i­dated with fail­ure. For me, fail­ure just makes the taste of suc­cess that much sweeter.

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