Thieves ter­ror­is­ing Den­bigh High stu­dents

Jamaica Gleaner - - NEWS - Corey Robinson Staff Re­porter corey.robinson@glean­erjm.com

STU­DENTS AND staff at the Den­bigh High School in Claren­don say they are liv­ing in fear, as hood­lums con­tinue to prey on them, steal­ing cel­lu­lar phones and other valu­ables as they make their way to and from school.

“It is some­thing that has been hap­pen­ing since school started this term. This road to school is con­tin­u­ously like that with the rob­beries. I am afraid to walk to school in the morn­ings and the chil­dren worse,” said one fe­male staff mem­ber, con­firm­ing the in­ci­dents af­ter in­form­ing The Sun­day Gleaner that the prin­ci­pal and her deputies were away at a meet­ing when we con­tacted the school.

“All of us here are very scared. This is some­thing that has been go­ing on for a long time. The police came here and I’m not sure what they are do­ing or what plans are in place, but it is re­ally a prob­lem here.”

She cited at least four re­cent in­ci­dents where mem­bers of the school com­mu­nity were held up.

On Mon­day, two fe­male stu­dents re­port­edly had their phones stolen af­ter two men jammed guns in their faces and de­manded the in­stru­ments. The girls were ap­par­ently walk­ing from a nearby taxi stand, past the Den­bigh Pri­mary School when the gun­men pounced. They were re­port­edly left un­armed.

The or­deal was a wor­ry­ing topic at the school dur­ing the week, com­pelling ad­min­is­tra­tors to is­sue a warning to the Hood­lums con­tinue to prey on the stu­dents of Den­bigh High School, steal­ing cel­lu­lar phones and other valu­ables.

stu­dents not to openly use their phones on the way to and from school. Stu­dents were also told to walk in groups, as op­posed to travers­ing the road by them­selves.

Other re­ports are that at least one teacher fell vic­tim to the rob­bers ear­lier this year, and that some foot­ballers play­ing in the vicin­ity of the school com­pound were robbed

re­cently.

“I am ter­ri­fied, trust me. My son just started to go to the school and I am now con­fronted with these is­sues, of which no­body in­formed me,” said Carol An­der­son, re­call­ing her frus­tra­tion when her child, a sev­enth-grader, in­formed her of the school’s an­nounce­ment last week.

“I told him not to take the phone to school, but who knows, he might just be in the vicin­ity and those crazy peo­ple de­cide to fire shots at the per­sons they are rob­bing if they refuse to give up their phones. He could get shot. Some­thing has to be done.”

“When you hear about the gun thing you re­ally have to get se­ri­ous now. Rob­bing the phone is one thing, but I don’t want to hear that I sent my child to school and them shoot him over phone,” lamented Max­ine Dixon, the par­ent of a gradeeight girl.

PRI­MARY SCHOOL NOT AF­FECTED

There were no re­ports that stu­dents and staff at the nearby Den­bigh Pri­mary School were be­ing plagued as well, and one teacher at that in­sti­tu­tion shared that the police carry out reg­u­lar pa­trols in the area.

It is for this rea­son that Se­nior Su­per­in­ten­dent of Police Fitz Bai­ley, head of the Claren­don Di­vi­sion, was shocked upon hear­ing of the com­plaints be­ing raised at the Den­bigh High School.

“I have been mak­ing checks since to­day [Thurs­day] and no­body can con­firm that from my of­fice. I can re­call one in­ci­dent in­volv­ing some guys play­ing foot­ball, but I don’t have any re­ports of an in­crease The or­deal was a wor­ry­ing topic at the Den­bigh High School dur­ing the week.

When you hear about the gun thing you re­ally have to get se­ri­ous now. Rob­bing the phone is one thing, but I don’t want to hear that I sent my child to school and them shoot him over phone.

based on what is com­mu­ni­cated to me from my in­ves­ti­ga­tors,” said Bai­ley.

“The police con­tinue to have rou­tine pa­trol of that en­tire vicin­ity. I can’t even say that I will ded­i­cate a pa­trol around there, be­cause if there are rob­beries and these are not be­ing re­ported to the police, then there is no way that we will know about it.”

Stu­dents were told to walk in groups, as op­posed to travers­ing the road by them­selves.

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