SHE IS A SUR­VIVOR

Jamaica Gleaner - - SEX & RELATIONSHIPS -

AS THE month­long drive to raise aware­ness for breast can­cer comes to an end, Flair read­ers would like to share their in­ter­pre­ta­tion of women who com­bated this deadly dis­ease to en­cour­age some­one af­fected. Keep fight­ing.

I don’t know of any­one di­rectly but I wit­nessed my grandma be­ing there for a life­time friend of hers who was di­ag­nosed with breast can­cer. She over­came the her ill­ness through chang­ing her thought process to be more pos­i­tive, do­ing a dou­ble mas­tec­tomy, mov­ing to a city that wasn’t

fast paced and less stress­ful, and in­dulged in more of the things that made her happy. She de­scribes her ill­ness as her great­est bless­ing be­cause it has al­lowed her to live the life she has al­ways wanted. – Corey Lin­der

I haven’t had a very close en­counter with some­one who I’m re­lated to. But based on my clin­i­cal ex­pe­ri­ence, I’d say the ex­pe­ri­ences are very dif­fer­ent, de­pend­ing on the in­di­vid­ual level of so­cial and fi­nan­cial sup­port. Most peo­ple ini­tially view the di­ag­no­sis of can­cer as a death sen­tence. But with coun­selling, so­cial sup­port and treat­ment they gen­er­ally be­come more em­pow­ered to over­come the dis­ease. It’s a unique, sober­ing and ma­tur­ing ex­pe­ri­ence for older women who have to grap­ple

with death. – Tariq Parker

She was the most vul­ner­a­ble one in the room, but the strong­est among them all. Be­cause she saw her loss as a gain in strength for her and oth­ers. – Cor­nell Rick­etts

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