Govern­ment, par­lia­ment limited po­lit­i­cal ac­tiv­i­ties: Can­di­date

Enezi to ad­dress sol­i­dar­ity, pris­on­ers of opin­ion, hu­man­i­tar­ian is­sues

Kuwait Times - - LOCAL - By Me­shaal Al-Enezi

Fourth con­stituency can­di­date for the 2016 par­lia­men­tary elec­tions and for­mer Mu­nic­i­pal Coun­cil mem­ber Ab­dul­lah Fah­had Al-Enezi said his mo­tive for run­ning was the govern­ment’s and the pre­vi­ous par­lia­ment’s fail­ure in achiev­ing the Kuwaiti peo­ple’s as­pi­ra­tions. He ac­cused both of se­lec­tive­ness and re­venge and us­ing var­i­ous tools to pres­sure po­lit­i­cal blocs and limit po­lit­i­cal ac­tiv­i­ties, in­stead of achiev­ing so­cial se­cu­rity.

Enezi holds a BA in en­gi­neer­ing from North Carolina Univer­sity in the US. He was a Mu­nic­i­pal Coun­cil mem­ber from 2009-2013 and chaired the coun­cil’s tech­ni­cal and Jahra com­mit­tees and the struc­tural plan com­mit­tee. He holds a hu­man rights ac­tivist cer­tifi­cate from the Arab League, has been an Arab Ar­bi­tra­tion Cen­ter fel­low, mem­ber of KES and found­ing mem­ber of Kuwait’s Coun­cil for Green Build­ings.

Speak­ing in an ex­clu­sive in­ter­view with Kuwait Times, Enezi added the one-vote elec­toral sys­tem di­vided the so­ci­ety and boosted sec­tar­i­an­ism

One-vote sys­tem di­vided the so­ci­ety and en­hanced sec­tar­i­an­ism and trib­al­ism

and trib­al­ism, which was clearly de­tected in the pre­vi­ous par­lia­ment. Enezi noted that the most important top­ics on his agenda in­clude strength­en­ing the do­mes­tic front, re­leas­ing pris­on­ers of opin­ion, giv­ing back cit­i­zen­ships that had been po­lit­i­cally with­drawn, stop­ping se­cu­rity pur­suits, fix­ing the de­te­ri­o­ra­tion in hu­man­i­tar­ian is­sues, solv­ing the bedoon prob­lem and pro­tect­ing cit­i­zens’ dig­ni­ties.

Fail­ure Kuwait Times: What is the rea­son be­hind your de­ci­sion to run for elec­tions?

Ab­dul­lah Al-Enezi: In view of the govern­ment’s and the pre­vi­ous par­lia­ment’s fail­ure in achiev­ing the Kuwaiti peo­ple’s as­pi­ra­tions and us­ing var­i­ous tools to op­press po­lit­i­cal pow­ers in­stead of achiev­ing so­cial se­cu­rity, and af­ter con­sult­ing my con­stituents, I de­cided to run to de­fend pub­lic gains and achieve pub­lic wishes. KT: What do you think of the one-vote elec­toral sys­tem?

Enezi: This sys­tem has di­vided the so­ci­ety and en­hanced sec­tar­i­an­ism and trib­al­ism, which were clear in the out­come of the pre­vi­ous par­lia­ment.

I will also give due care to youth to help them achieve their as­pi­ra­tions and hopes

KT: If you win the elec­tions, will you try to amend it? Enezi: We will work hard on amend­ing this de­cree and seek a fair elec­toral sys­tem that en­hances democ­racy.

Main is­sues KT: What are the main is­sues you will tackle? Enezi: I will fo­cus on na­tional sol­i­dar­ity, re­leas­ing pris­on­ers of opin­ion,

This is mes­sage from the boy­cotters to the govern­ment, telling that it was go­ing through the wrong paths

giv­ing back cit­i­zen­ships that had been po­lit­i­cally with­drawn, stop­ping se­cu­rity pur­suits, fix­ing de­te­ri­o­ra­tion in hu­man­i­tar­ian is­sues, solv­ing the bedoon prob­lem and pro­tect­ing cit­i­zens’ dig­ni­ties.

I will also give due care to youth to help them achieve their as­pi­ra­tions and hopes un­der an um­brella of so­cial jus­tice and equal op­por­tu­ni­ties. I will also work on pro­vid­ing them with proper hous­ing to end their suf­fer­ings in a coun­try that pos­sesses all po­ten­tials.

I will also work on de­vel­op­ing ser­vices in Jahra and Far­waniya in par­tic­u­lar and the coun­try in gen­eral by pass­ing de­vel­op­ment projects, fol­low­ing up their ex­e­cu­tion and hold­ing those ac­cused of dere­lic­tion ac­count­able. KT: What do you think of the pre­vi­ous par­lia­ment?

Enezi: The pre­vi­ous par­lia­ment dis­ap­pointed us and was not up to its re­spon­si­bil­i­ties, and I ex­pect a great deal of change in the com­ing one.

KT: How do you view the par­tic­i­pa­tion of the op­po­si­tion that had boy­cotted pre­vi­ous elec­tions?

Enezi: This is mes­sage from the boy­cotters to the govern­ment, telling it that it was go­ing through the wrong paths and that this needs to be set straight to make the peo­ple the source of all pow­ers.

Women are highly val­ued by the en­tire so­ci­ety as moth­ers, sis­ters and wives

KT: Do you think any fe­male can­di­dates will make it to the com­ing par­lia­ment?

Enezi: Women are highly val­ued by the en­tire so­ci­ety as moth­ers, sis­ters and wives. They are not to be taken lightly and surely have what it takes to be­come MPs. But I ex­pect only one of them to win a par­lia­men­tary seat.

KT: What is the per­cent­age of change you ex­pect in the com­ing par­lia­ment?

Enezi: For the past three years, peo­ple have been an­gry with law­mak­ers’ per­for­mance and I ex­pect an 80 per­cent turnover in the com­ing par­lia­ment.

KT: What per­cent­age of par­tic­i­pa­tion do you ex­pect? Why?

Enezi: Now that the Kuwaiti peo­ple have seen the short­com­ings of the dis­solved par­lia­ment, I ex­pect a 75 per­cent turnout in the elec­tions due to the tense re­gional sit­u­a­tion that calls for ef­fec­tive par­tic­i­pa­tion. We also wit­nessed hu­man right vi­o­la­tions, re­strict­ing lib­er­ties and a sys­tem­atic ‘as­sault’ on cit­i­zens’ pock­ets and in­comes, which af­fected the lives of many and made them de­tect dan­ger. There­fore, I ex­pect higher rates of par­tic­i­pa­tion to pro­tect cit­i­zens, be­cause laws passed by the pre­vi­ous par­lia­ment were against them.

False prom­ises KT: What do you think of the false prom­ises made by some pre­vi­ous MPs? Enezi: The dis­solved par­lia­ment was one with­out will. We all agree that MPs’ per­for­mance was way be­low par, al­though they had promised not to af­fect cit­i­zens’ in­come, but what hap­pened is that they took part in do­ing so in the very first test of such prom­ises. This will not de­ceive the Kuwaiti peo­ple. KT: Is the bedoon is­sue on your elec­toral pro­gram?

Enezi: The govern­ment must ac­knowl­edge the con­tri­bu­tions of bedoons who pro­tected this land side by side with cit­i­zens in times of dis­tress. The prob­lem has to be hu­manely and legally re­solved in a way that achieves de­cent lives for them and grant them full hu­man rights, es­pe­cially since we live in a ‘hu­man­i­tar­ian cen­ter’. The govern­ment must also grant cit­i­zen­ship to those who de­serve it and not use these de­mands for po­lit­i­cal bar­gain­ing. KT: What do you think of the DNA law?

Enezi: This law is against the sharia, norms and tra­di­tions. I do thank HH the Amir for set­ting things right and or­der­ing the govern­ment to restudy it. If I win, I will as­sess the govern­ment’s re­ac­tion to this law and will help it if it re­spects HH the Amir’s wishes. Other­wise, the govern­ment will be held ac­count­able for any re­li­gious or con­sti­tu­tional vi­o­la­tions. KT: What is your im­pres­sion about writ­ing off loans?

Enezi: Con­sumer loans is surely an is­sue that af­fects all Kuwaiti fam­i­lies. The peo­ple have been suf­fer­ing be­cause of loans they would not have re­sorted to if it were not for the govern­ment’s fail­ures and blun­ders. Jus­tice must be ob­served for ev­ery­one on writ­ing off such loans.

Ab­dul­lah Fah­had Al-Enezi’s elec­tions poster, with a motto that reads “safe­guard­ing a na­tion.”

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