FROM THE LAND

Taste & Flavors - - CONTENT - food­her­itage­foun­da­tion food­her­itage food-her­itage.org

Heir­loom toma­toes with the Food Her­itage Foun­da­tion

HEIR­LOOM TOMATO OR JABALIYEH TOMATO IS ALSO RE­FERRED TO AS “REAL TOMATO” GIVEN THAT IT IS A NAT­U­RAL VA­RI­ETY THAT HAS BEEN PASSED DOWN THROUGH THE GEN­ER­A­TIONS; FROM FARMER TO FARMER

Jabaliyeh tomato salad with gar­lic & sumac

In Le­banon, Jabaliyeh toma­toes are com­monly served in lo­cal restau­rants with the mezza dishes, as tomato slices cov­ered with gar­lic, olive oil and sumac.

Makes 1 plate 190 calo­ries/serv­ing

IN­GRE­DI­ENTS

• 1 Jabaliyeh tomato (200g) • 4 gar­lic cloves • 1 tbsp olive oil • ½ tsp salt • 1 pinch sumac

PREPA­RA­TION

Wash the tomato and cut it into slices (1cm aprox.). Place the tomato slices on a plate and put it in the fridge. In the mean­time, crush the gar­lic cloves and mix them with the oil and salt to ob­tain a paste. Spread the gar­lic paste on each tomato slice. Sprin­kle some sumac on each slice as well. You can serve this plate alone as a side dish/salad or add the tomato slice to any other salad.

Tomato sauce

Tomato sauce is widely used in cook­ing, es­pe­cially in our lo­cal stews. It is a very rich source of vi­ta­mins A and C. It tastes best when you make it from fresh Jabaliyeh toma­toes. 1 serv­ing = 1 cup 42 calo­ries/serv­ing

IN­GRE­DI­ENTS

• 1 kg ripe Jabaliyeh tomato (yield 1L

of tomato juice) • 1 tsp su­gar • 1 tsp salt • ½ tsp gar­lic or basil or thyme

(op­tional, for fla­vor)

PREPA­RA­TION

Thor­oughly wash and clean the toma­toes. method: place the toma­toes in boil­ing wa­ter for 30 sec­onds and then place them in a bowl of cold wa­ter. The skin is eas­ily re­moved. Cut the toma­toes into four equal pieces each and re­move the seeds. Smash the tomato pieces us­ing a potato smasher or place them in a mixer to ex­tract the tomato juice. Boil the tomato juice for 2530 min­utes over medium fire. If the juice is not liq­uid enough, add 2 cups of wa­ter. Add the su­gar and salt. Add ½ tea­spoon of gar­lic, thyme or basil for fla­vor (op­tional). Fil­ter the juice through a strainer, f ill it in glass bot­tles and close prop­erly.

Tomato paste

Tomato paste, like many other pre­serves in the Le­banese reper­toire of 'moune', is a way to con­serve foods for con­sump­tion dur­ing the scarce win­ter sea­son and for the times when toma­toes are not fresh and avail­able. Tra­di­tion­ally, tomato juice is heated over a wood fire for a few hours to ob­tain the paste that can be eaten raw in a sand­wich with fresh oregano leaves and olive oil or used in cook­ing. 1 serv­ing = 1 tbsp 12 calo­ries/serv­ing

IN­GRE­DI­ENTS

• 7kg raw Jabaliyeh toma­toes (yield

1kg of tomato paste) • 75g salt

PREPA­RA­TION

Peel the toma­toes us­ing the blanch­ing method; place the toma­toes in boil­ing wa­ter for 30 sec­onds and then place them in a bowl the toma­toes into four equal pieces each and re­move the seeds. Smash the tomato pieces us­ing a potato smasher or place them in a mixer to ex­tract the tomato juice. Add 75g of salt to the tomato juice. Boil the tomato juice over medium fire for around 4-6 hours un­til all the wa­ter evap­o­rates and a tomato paste is formed. Pour the hot tomato paste into a dry and clean 1kg glass jar. Close the jar im­me­di­ately after fill­ing. The tomato paste can be con­served for up to one year.

To in­crease the shelf life of the tomato juice, place the tomato juice bot­tles up­side down ina pot filled with wa­ter. Boil the wa­ter for few min­utes. keep the bot­tles in­side the pot un­til the wa­ter cools down. this process ex­tends the shelf life of the tomato juice up to 6 months.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Lebanon

© PressReader. All rights reserved.