A prom­ise kept

BN stay­ing com­mit­ted to a pol­icy of wealth re­dis­tri­bu­tion

New Straits Times - - News -

SOME three years ago, the re­de­vel­op­ment of Peruma­han Awam (PA) Razak Man­sion be­gan on the prom­ise of greater com­fort for low-in­come res­i­dents. Yes­ter­day, that prom­ise was de­liv­ered when Prime Min­is­ter Datuk Seri Na­jib Razak handed over keys to the new apart­ments. No longer will they be liv­ing in low-cost flats of some 500 sq ft or less, in­stead their new homes will be about dou­ble that. Where once the flats were with ei­ther one or two bed­rooms with a sin­gle bath­room, the apart­ments now have two or three bed­rooms and two bath­rooms, with enough liv­ing area for a fam­ily. For owne­roc­cu­piers of the PA Razak Man­sion, it is a mat­ter of mov­ing into com­fort with­out spend­ing a sin­gle sen, rather the gov­ern­ment will sub­sidise the move with a RM3,000 grant. Kuala Lumpur City Hall pub­lic hous­ing ten­ants, mean­while, are of­fered these apart­ments val­ued at over a quar­ter of a mil­lion ring­git for a mere RM42,000, and all con­veyanc­ing costs are cov­ered by the gov­ern­ment.

1Razak Man­sion is lo­cated just be­hind PA Razak Man­sion, mean­ing the res­i­dents re­tain the ad­van­tage of liv­ing in Kuala Lumpur with all its at­ten­dant fa­cil­i­ties, such as the ready avail­abil­ity of pub­lic trans­port. It will have all the same ameni­ties and more. The mul­tira­cial na­ture of the 1Razak Man­sion com­mu­nity, one trans­planted from the old Razak Man­sion that has long flour­ished, will be a show­piece, an ex­am­ple of muhibah, tes­ti­fy­ing to the very real in­te­gra­tion dreamt by the na­tion’s found­ing fathers, one of whom is the late Tun Ab­dul Razak Hus­sein, the prime min­is­ter’s fa­ther. It was of­fi­cially opened for oc­cu­pa­tion in 1967. By all ac­counts, af­ter half a cen­tury, the com­mu­nity has ma­tured and multi-eth­nic unity is a re­al­ity.

This very con­ti­nu­ity of as­pi­ra­tion and achieve­ment epit­o­mises the suc­cess that is Malaysia, weld­ing to­gether eth­nic groups to live side-by-side and shoul­der-to-shoul­der in a har­mo­nious en­vi­ron­ment of com­par­a­tive pros­per­ity. Where other na­tions have dis­in­te­grated from eth­nic con­flicts, Malaysia has pro­gres­sively in­te­grated, firstly, be­tween its three con­stituent ter­ri­to­ries and, sec­ondly, within the penin­sula. In short, liv­ing cheek by jowl, as in Razak Man­sion, is proof that the Malaysian na­tion is thriv­ing.

As the coun­try ap­proaches the 14th Gen­eral Elec­tion, might it not be ap­pro­pri­ate for the po­lit­i­cal par­ties to re­flect this re­al­ity? Po­lit­i­cally, ap­peal­ing to Malaysians gen­er­ally would be a re­fresh­ing change. It is time pol­icy de­liv­ery de­fines pol­i­tics given that there are states ruled by the op­po­si­tion. To­day, as never be­fore, Malaysians can com­pare ap­ples to ap­ples. Is Se­lan­gor, un­der the op­po­si­tion, mak­ing waves? Or is it stag­nat­ing un­der such inane poli­cies as “no plas­tic bags”, more an in­con­ve­nience than an en­vi­ron­men­tal cru­sade be­cause plas­tics are to­day biodegrad­able? What has Pe­nang de­liv­ered to the peo­ple un­der DAP? A min­i­mum wage to be en­vied by other Malaysians? 1Razak Man­sion is ex­em­plary. Not only is it a so­cial en­gi­neer­ing feat, it is, too, a po­lit­i­cal eco­nomic ex­pres­sion of suc­cess­ful wealth re­dis­tri­bu­tion ex­er­cise.

1Razak Man­sion is lo­cated just be­hind PA Razak Man­sion, mean­ing the res­i­dents re­tain the ad­van­tage of liv­ing in Kuala Lumpur with all its at­ten­dant fa­cil­i­ties, such as the ready avail­abil­ity of pub­lic trans­port. It will have all the same ameni­ties and more.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Malaysia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.