Re­sults bring teens closer to dreams

New Straits Times - - News -

SHAH ALAM: The sac­ri­fice of a fa­ther who quit his job to look af­ter his half-paral­ysed son paid off yesterday when the lat­ter scored straight As in the Si­jil Pe­la­jaran Malaysia (SPM)

The fa­ther, from Subang Jaya, who only wanted to be known as Tan and used to be a quan­tity sur­veyor, was ex­cited when his son, Tan Han Hsen, was an­nounced as one of Se­lan­gor’s top stu­dents in SPM.

Han Hsen, 18, who has spinal mus­cu­lar at­ro­phy and has been wheel­chair-bound since age 7, scored 9A+ and 1A- in the exam.

The SMK Seafield stu­dent said his fa­ther quit his job a few years ago to take care of him.

“My fa­ther used to be a quan­tity sur­veyor, but he sac­ri­ficed his job to help me get through my daily rou­tine.”

The teenager, who is do­ing his A Lev­els at Sun­way Col­lege, be­lieved that con­sis­tent re­vi­sion ev­ery day was the key to suc­cess.

As for Mo­hamed A’azim Ai­man Mo­hamed A’azam, 18, scor­ing two As was all it took to paint a smile on his face.

A’azim and two oth­ers re­ceived spe­cial recog­ni­tion from SMK Seksyen 9, Shah Alam, yesterday for pass­ing all sub­jects, prov­ing that be­ing hear­ing im­paired was no bar­rier to good re­sults.

A’azim, who wants to be­come an ac­coun­tant, said he would spend a few hours ev­ery day in the In­te­grated Spe­cial Child Ed­u­ca­tion Pro­gramme when he was in Form 1 be­fore classes be­gan.

“Al­ham­dulil­lah, I am happy with my re­sults. I got As in my favourite sub­jects,” said A’azim, who scored As for Mod­ern Math­e­mat­ics and Ac­count­ing.

In Kuala Lumpur, SEA Games ath­lete Veron­ica Lee did not let her love for syn­chro­nised swim­ming get in the way of achiev­ing straight As in her SPM.

With her busy train­ing sched­ule as a na­tional ath­lete, she could only spend two hours in class at SMK Amin­ud­din Baki ev­ery day.

De­scrib­ing her­self as a men­tally and phys­i­cally tough per­son, Lee said she used to spend the rest of her day at tu­ition classes and train­ing sessions.

“I wanted to do well as an ath­lete and a stu­dent. I think hard work is key. If we work hard, we will get what we want.”

Nur Nas­rin Ali, from SMK (P) Sri Aman, Pe­tal­ing Jaya, said she found Ad­di­tional Math­e­mat­ics ques­tions tough and did not ex­pect to score 6As and 3Bs.

Nur Nas­rin, who is ac­tive in sports and part of the Fed­eral Ter­ri­to­ries bowl­ing team, had skipped school for three months last year to pre­pare for the Malaysia Games in July.

“I did not ex­pect to do so well af­ter be­ing ab­sent from school. I hope to pur­sue my stud­ies in in­for­ma­tion tech­nol­ogy and ma­jor in net­work se­cu­rity.”

In Kota Baru, Nu­rif­fah Ramizu, from SMK Pan­chor Per­dana, had been fac­ing dif­fi­cul­ties to write since four years ago af­ter her right arm was paral­ysed fol­low­ing a high fever when she was 12.

She said she un­der­went phys­io­ther­apy at Raja Perem­puan Zainab II Hos­pi­tal fre­quently.

De­spite her dis­abil­ity, Nu­rif­fah vowed to work hard to achieve her am­bi­tion to be­come an ac­coun­tant. She scored 8As.

In Ji­tra , dis­abil­ity and poverty did not stop Muham­mad Syahir Umar from scor­ing 8A+ and 1A.

The SM Sul­tan Ab­dul Halim stu­dent, who has hear­ing dif­fi­culty in his right ear, re­lied on a monthly RM100 za­kat al­lowance and gov­ern­ment schol­ar­ship to get through his stud­ies.

“It is my dream to achieve good re­sults so that I can take care of my par­ents. I wish to study en­gi­neer­ing in Ja­pan.”

In Kan­gar , Ah­mad Zahir Ah­mad Zal­izan was among the top SPM scor­ers in Perlis, with 9A+.

The SMK Derma stu­dent said two of his broth­ers were study­ing medicine, and he wanted to fol­low in their foot­steps and pur­sue ter­tiary ed­u­ca­tion.

“I want to take up Math­e­mat­ics and be­come a pro­fes­sor.”

In Ni­lai, Nata­sya Qisty Mohd Ridzuan, who scored 9A+, was the cen­tre of at­ten­tion at Tunku Kur­shiah Col­lege as many thought she re­sem­bled ac­tress Neelofa.

“Neelofa is truly a beauty. I pale in com­par­i­son. Nev­er­the­less, I am flat­tered to be com­pared with some­one like her,” Nata­sya said.

She said she wanted to pur­sue her stud­ies in sci­ence and was not in­ter­ested in show­biz.

The col­lege emerged as the top school in Ne­gri Sem­bi­lan for SPM 2016. It is also the best fully-res­i­den­tial board­ing school na­tion­wide, with 62 out of 151 can­di­dates scor­ing straight As.

In Ipoh, Chiang Wai Cheng, 19, was di­ag­nosed with Duchenne mus­cu­lar dys­tro­phy (DMD) at the age of 9 and was told he might not live long.

But that did not dampen his de­sire to ex­cel.

Wai Cheng, from SMK Tan­jong Rambu­tan, scored 6As and 3Bs and was awarded as the Best Stu­dent Award (Dis­abled Cat­e­gory) for Perak.

Wai Cheng said he ded­i­cated his suc­cess to his fa­ther, Chiang Wan Marn, 51, who quit his job to look af­ter him and his brother, who has the same dis­ease.

His mother had died from breast cancer.

Wai Cheng, who is wheelchair­bound, said since his move­ment was lim­ited, he did not at­tend any ad­di­tional or tu­ition classes. In­stead, he spent about two hours daily study­ing via YouTube.

In Malacca , Rueben John Abra­ham, from St John’s In­sti­tu­tion, knew what he needed to do to per­form in his SPM and he ex­e­cuted his plan to per­fec­tion, scor­ing 10 straight A+, mak­ing him Malacca’s top per­former.

Rueben, who was the only one who achieved the per­fect score, said he was on his way to achiev­ing his dream of be­com­ing a civil en­gi­neer.

He is do­ing his A Lev­els at Sun­way Uni­ver­sity in Subang Jaya.

“I didn’t feel much pres­sure. It was only around Septem­ber that I be­gan to re­ally fo­cus on SPM. My par­ents helped by get­ting me past year pa­pers.”

Reuben’s twin sister, Ruth El­iz­a­beth, from In­fant Jesus Con­vent, was among 20 stu­dents in Malacca who scored nine As.

“But she didn’t score nine A+,” Rueben joked.

“No, he didn’t study,” joked Reuben’s fa­ther, Dr Abra­ham John, 57.

“The only time we saw him study was when he went for tu­ition classes. But, he has a very good mem­ory, so study­ing is easy for him.” Page 1 pic: Anis Nur Athi­rah Ah­mad Sukari (third from right) re­acts as she is an­nounced as the top SPM scorer for Tunku Kur­shiah Col­lege, with 10 A+, in Ni­lai yesterday.

ZULFADHLI ZULKIFLI PIC BY

Syn­chro­nised swim­mer Veron­ica Lee (cen­tre), from SMK Amin­ud­din Baki, with the school’s prin­ci­pal, Siti Sarimah Shaik Ab­dul Rah­man (right), and a teacher at the school in Kuala Lumpur yesterday.

PIC BY ADI SAFRI

1. Straight-A stu­dents of SM Sains Muar with their Si­jil Pe­la­jaran Malaysia re­sults in Johor yesterday.

PIC BY SHARUL HAFIZ ZAM

4. Ed­u­ca­tion Min­is­ter Datuk Seri Mahdzir Khalid talk­ing to Ul As­mak Ul Husna Azmy (third from right), who scored 10As in SPM, at SMK Kubang Rotan in Alor Star yesterday.

PIC BY MALAI ROSMAH TUAH

5. Gan Min Hong from SMK Agaseh in La­had Datu, Sabah, hold­ing a sign show­ing her SPM score yesterday.

PIC BY MUHAIZAN YAHYA

2. Spe­cial needs stu­dent Chiang Wai Cheng (cen­tre), 19, of SMK Tan­jong Rambu­tan, who scored 6As and 3Bs, shar­ing his joy with stu­dents from other schools in Ipoh af­ter col­lect­ing his re­sults at the Perak Ed­u­ca­tion Depart­ment of­fice yesterday.

PIC BY DANIALD SAAD

3. Fri­en­nds (from left) Y. Ed­win, S. Prasshaanth, Muham­mad Iz­zudin Syed Hus­seinn and San­deep Singh Gill of SM Bukit JJam­bul show­ing their SPM re­sult slips. TThe four are among five in Pe­nangg who scored A+ in all sub­jects.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Malaysia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.