For or against?

New Straits Times - - Higher Ed - LEELA CHAKRABARTY ed­u­ca­tion@nst.com.my GUIDE­LINES FOR WRIT­ING AN ARGUMENTATIVE ES­SAY The out­line is ba­si­cally made up of four main sec­tions: Key Fea­tures The­sis state­ment (In­tro­duc­tion) PRO idea 1 PRO idea 2 Con­clu­sion Key Fea­tures The­sis state­men

PATTE RN 1

AN argumentative es­say deals with top­ics that are de­bat­able. In this es­say you at­tempt to con­vince the reader of the strength of your ar­gu­ment by pro­vid­ing well-rea­soned points and refu­ta­tions. You should also sup­port you points with facts and not with some hazy or emo­tional ar­gu­ments. All argumentative top­ics have PROs (sup­port­ing ideas) and CONs (op­pos­ing ideas).

You should clearly take your stand and write as if you are try­ing to per­suade an op­pos­ing au­di­ence to adopt new be­liefs or be­hav­iour.

The pri­mary ob­jec­tive is to per­suade peo­ple to change be­liefs that many of them do not want to change.

Per­sua­sive writ­ing style that we have dis­cussed in the last is­sue is some­times con­sid­ered as argumentative writ­ing.

How­ever, it is usu­ally safe to as­sume that an argumentative pa­per presents a stronger claim, pos­si­bly to a more re­sis­tant au­di­ence.

You will need to gather ev­i­dence and present a well-rea­soned ar­gu­ment on a de­bat­able is­sue to write an argumentative es­say.

In­tro­duc­tion

De­vel­op­ing the ar­gu­ment

Re­fut­ing op­po­nents ar­gu­ments

Con­clu­sion

CON(s) + Refu­ta­tion(s)

PATTE RN 2

CON(s) + Refu­ta­tion(s)

PRO idea 2

PATTE RN 3

CON idea 1 (Refu­ta­tion)

Con­clu­sion

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