Par­rots have ther­a­pists to teach them how to be­have

The Star Malaysia - Star2 - - Living -

PLUCK­ING out their own feath­ers, scream­ing ex­ces­sively and be­com­ing ag­gres­sive: Par­rots can de­velop be­havioural dis­or­ders if they are not treated ap­pro­pri­ately.

Cas­tra­tion can help calm down male birds, but it’s not a catch-all so­lu­tion to more deep-rooted prob­lems, ac­cord­ing to Lukas Reese from the Ger­man Ve­teri­nary As­so­ci­a­tion for An­i­mal Pro­tec­tion. In any case, it’s not rec­om­mended by most ve­teri­nary ex­perts, and is even il­le­gal in many coun­tries.

To keep par­rots calm and happy in a way that is ap­pro­pri­ate for their species, own­ers should pay at­ten­tion to the fol­low­ing:

Do not keep them alone: Par­rots are so­cial crea­tures and need a part­ner. A hu­man be­ing can be a great com­pan­ion, but is no sub­sti­tute for an­other bird.

Keep them oc­cu­pied: Par­rots are very in­tel­li­gent and there­fore need some­thing to do. Toys, feed­ers or a home aviary with lots of dif­fer­ent sec­tions are great for keep­ing them busy.

Get to know them: Own­ers should col­lect in­for­ma­tion on the char­ac­ter­is­tics of their par­rot in ad­vance. For ex­am­ple, macaws com­mu­ni­cate very loudly, and the owner can­not stop their pet par­rot from do­ing this.

If a par­rot con­tin­ues to dis­play odd be­hav­iour, the owner should check the state of the bird’s health. If there aren’t any or­ganic causes, own­ers are ad­vised to con­tact a be­havioural trainer. – dpa

Par­rots are so­cial crea­tures and need a part­ner. A hu­man be­ing can be a great com­pan­ion, but is no sub­sti­tute for an­other bird. — FRANZISKA GABBERT/dpa

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