HIT THE FLOOR

At-home work­outs that work

Fashion Quarterly - - Contents -

Med­i­ta­tive, restora­tive, adren­a­line-pump­ing or mus­cle­build­ing — what­ever type of fit­ness is your favourite is be­sides the point. When it comes down to it, we need to move to stay healthy. If you’re not keen to get locked into a gym mem­ber­ship, but need the mo­ti­va­tion to start your own fit­ness plan, then this one’s for you.

Per­sonal trainer Nats Levi (nat­slevi.com) didn’t al­ways feel like phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity came nat­u­rally to her, but as a self-con­fessed shy in­tro­vert, she dis­cov­ered the power of ex­er­cise to boost her con­fi­dence. Now fully qual­i­fied, she’s help­ing women achieve the ben­e­fits for them­selves through her four-week per­son­alised ex­er­cise pro­grammes and on­line com­mu­nity. We picked Nats’ brain about how to start work­ing out at home to the beat of your own drum.

WHAT TYPE OF AT-HOME EX­ER­CISE DO YOU REC­OM­MEND FOR PEO­PLE WHO ARE JUST START­ING OUT?

Body­weight train­ing is highly ef­fec­tive and sim­ple to add into your daily life. This could be any style of train­ing, from yoga or con­di­tion­ing cir­cuits from an app or tai­lored pro­gramme, to go­ing for a walk/jog/run out­side. Try not to get too hung up on the type or style of train­ing and just move.

WHAT ARE SOME COM­MON MIS­TAKES PEO­PLE MAKE WHEN WORK­ING OUT AT HOME TO APPS OR YOUTUBE VIDEOS?

Peo­ple often mis­judge their ca­pa­bil­i­ties and don’t un­der­stand the co­or­di­na­tion that’s in­volved. Keep it sim­ple. Work on the ba­sics of hu­man move­ment first — push, pull, press, lunge, squat, bend, twist and gait — and don’t try to do ev­ery­thing in one day. Take your time and work on cre­at­ing a sus­tain­able life­style, rather than cram­ming lots into a week when your en­ergy and mo­ti­va­tion is high. Mo­ti­va­tion will fade, but a re­al­is­tic sched­ule and an ex­er­cise habit will stick and bring the de­sired re­sults.

HOW CAN YOU TELL IF YOU’RE DO­ING A WORK­OUT WRONG WHEN THERE’S NO TRAINER AROUND?

Film­ing your­self and com­par­ing your move­ment to the in­struc­tional footage is a great idea — pro­vid­ing the in­struc­tor has great tech­nique, of course. Watch things like an­kle, knee and hip move­ment; body pos­ture and align­ment; where your body is in space; and where you start and stop your mo­tion. If a move causes pain, don’t do it. Burn­ing mus­cles from fa­tigue and chal­leng­ing ex­er­cise is okay, but any­thing be­yond this is cause for con­cern.

WHAT ARE YOUR TIPS FOR STAY­ING MO­TI­VATED?

Set goals that are small and achiev­able, and cel­e­brate small wins so you build pos­i­tive mo­men­tum to keep driv­ing to­wards your big­ger goal. Most im­por­tantly, set a ‘why’. Why do you want to achieve your goal? What deep, burn­ing, emo­tional de­sire is it at­tached to? When your ‘why’ is mean­ing­ful enough and you’re hon­est with your­self, you’ll stay driven to change your cur­rent level of health and fit­ness.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand

© PressReader. All rights reserved.