5 ways to avoid so­cial me­dia blun­ders

Kapi-Mana News - - MOTORING -

has some dos and don’ts for suc­cess with so­cial me­dia.

As much as I love/hate so­cial me­dia, I can’t imag­ine a world with­out NeighTwitBookIn­staChat. I mean, what else would I do dur­ing long bor­ing meet­ings?

But while so­cial me­dia plat­forms have be­come an es­sen­tial part to most of our lives (nearly 90 per cent of Ki­wis aged 15 years or older use so­cial me­dia), many of us are still not us­ing it ‘‘cor­rectly’’.

We all have our pet peeves about so­cial me­dia (who’s sick of see­ing baby photos?), and sadly it’s all too com­mon to hear sto­ries about – or be sub­jected to – on­line bul­ly­ing. So how can you avoid some of the most fre­quently made so­cial me­dia pit­falls?

DON’T POST DRUNKEN PHOTOS OF YOUR­SELF

Many em­ploy­ers and re­cruit­ment agen­cies use so­cial me­dia as a back­ground check. Go­ing out is fun, but post­ing in­crim­i­nat­ing photos of your­self on so­cial me­dia af­ter­wards might come back to haunt you when it comes to your cur­rent job or any fu­ture em­ploy­ment. If your friend is the one post­ing the pic­tures, sim­ply un­tag your­self.

DON’T POST TOO MANY PIC­TURES OF YOUR KIDS

We get that you’re proud that your baby said his first word aged seven weeks (it wasn’t; it was just a burp), but you don’t need to spam your friends’ time­lines with photos and videos of your kids.

More and more par­ents are set­ting up pri­vate so­cial me­dia ac­counts that only se­lect friends and fam­ily can view to give their kids more on­line pri­vacy. It’s in­creas­ingly com­mon, too, for par­ents to avoid post­ing pic­tures of their kids on so­cial me­dia al­to­gether un­til they’re old enough to vet what goes on­line.

DON’T POST HOL­I­DAY SNAPS – UN­TIL YOU GET HOME

Check­ing into the air­port and telling the world that you’re ‘‘Head­ing to Bali for three weeks – can’t wait to get a tan!’’ is great if you’re try­ing to make peo­ple jeal­ous, or at­tract op­por­tunis­tic bur­glars. If you just have to tell the world, book a house-sit­ter too.

DON’T BE A BULLY

On­line bul­ly­ing is rife in New Zealand. Any­one think­ing of hid­ing be­hind so­cial me­dia to post ma­li­cious com­ments or in­crim­i­nat­ing photos to bully other peo­ple should be­come fa­mil­iar with the Harm­ful Dig­i­tal Com­mu­ni­ca­tions Act first.

If your chil­dren are on so­cial me­dia, reg­u­larly make sure both they and you feel com­fort­able about what they’re ex­pe­ri­enc­ing. If they are be­ing bul­lied, don’t be afraid to get their school in­volved. If it’s you, don’t be afraid to block or re­port the troll to so­cial me­dia ad­min­is­tra­tors. If that doesn’t help, re­port them to the po­lice.

DO MOVE TO MORE FACE-TO­FACE IN­TER­AC­TION

Un­like some other so­cial me­dia plat­forms, Neigh­bourly.co.nz ac­tively en­cour­ages neigh­bours and com­mu­ni­ties to first con­nect vir­tu­ally then meet in real life over some com­mon ground – their neigh­bour­hood. Vir­tual re­la­tion­ships can serve a pur­pose, but face-to-face re­la­tion­ships are al­ways much more sus­tain­ing.

123RF

If your child is be­ing bul­lied, don’t be afraid to get their school in­volved.

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