THE 4 TYPES OF BUY­ING CUS­TOMERS: HOW YOUR WEB­SITE CAN CATCH THEM

LOOK­ING TO CON­VERT MORE LEADS INTO SALES FROM YOUR WEB­SITE? AS COR­NELIUS BOERT­JENS EX­PLAINS, IT’S ALL ABOUT CAT­E­GORIS­ING YOUR TAR­GET AU­DI­ENCE COR­RECTLY AND IM­PLE­MENTED THE NEC­ES­SARY MEA­SURES TO REEL THEM IN.

NZ Business - - CON­TENTS -

Con­vert­ing more leads into sales from your web­site.

M ak­ing your e-com­merce of­fer­ing suc­cess­ful is eas­ier than you think, but there are cer­tain fac­tors to take into ac­count to make this hap­pen.

Know­ing your au­di­ence is the start of your suc­cess. It’s then trans­lat­ing this au­di­ence and their in­di­vid­ual wants and needs onto your land­ing page that is key.

There are four types of buy­ing cus­tomers. Know­ing who they are and how they work can go a long way to mak­ing your land­ing page more ef­fec­tive and con­vert­ing leads into sales.

By plac­ing your tar­get au­di­ence in the right cat­e­gory, you can be sure that visits will trans­late into ac­tion. So let’s talk about those four cat­e­gories. #1 THE COM­PET­I­TIVE CUS­TOMER Cus­tomers who fall un­der the com­pet­i­tive cat­e­gory live their lives ac­cord­ing to high stan­dards. They not only im­pose th­ese stan­dards on them­selves, but also on other peo­ple. For that very rea­son, your

land­ing page must meet the high stan­dards that this com­pet­i­tive cus­tomer has come to ex­pect, other­wise they will not take the time to look at your prod­ucts and/or ser­vices.

The com­pet­i­tive cus­tomer will ask two main ques­tions when vis­it­ing a land­ing page: “What can your com­pany do for me?” and “Why are you bet­ter than other ser­vices?”

They see your prod­uct or ser­vice as some­thing that can help them reach their next goal, so it should be pre­sented as such.

If you have some suc­cess­ful and fa­mous clients, be sure to men­tion them on your land­ing page. This will def­i­nitely con­vince com­pet­i­tive cus­tomers who al­ways want to bet­ter them­selves. Com­pet­i­tive cus­tomers like to en­gage with big play­ers, so you must ap­pear to be one in or­der to keep th­ese cus­tomers.

#2 THE SPON­TA­NEOUS CUS­TOMER

A spon­ta­neous cus­tomer is quite ad­ven­tur­ous, im­pul­sive, and sus­cep­ti­ble to so-called ‘im­pulse buy­ing’. They do not like mak­ing de­ci­sions and so love quick shop­ping. Know­ing this can def­i­nitely play to your ad­van­tage and trans­late into a huge amount of sales.

The two ques­tions this type of cus­tomer will ask are: “What can you do for me at the mo­ment?” and “How can this give me more en­joy­ment in life?”

When speak­ing to a spon­ta­neous cus­tomer, it’s best to use guar­an­tees. A good ex­am­ple of an ef­fec­tive one is the money-back guar­an­tee, which shows the spon­ta­neous cus­tomer that they are safe if they don’t like your prod­uct or ser­vice once they buy it. You can also use spe­cial and timed of­fers, since spon­ta­neous cus­tomers will be more in­clined to buy or use a ser­vice if it is avail­able at a spe­cial price and for a short pe­riod of time.

In short, the land­ing page for the spon­ta­neous cus­tomer should be sim­ple and of­fer some­thing they can­not re­sist. They will then take im­me­di­ate ac­tion.

#3 THE ME­THOD­I­CAL CUS­TOMER

When deal­ing with a me­thod­i­cal cus­tomer you’re deal­ing with a plan­ner. They like to see things or­gan­ised and struc­tured, es­pe­cially when it comes to ser­vices. This cus­tomer also does their re­search and will read ev­ery­thing on your land­ing page, care­fully eval­u­at­ing ev­ery lit­tle de­tail. They over­think ev­ery de­ci­sion they make, but this can also play to your ad­van­tage.

Even though me­thod­i­cal cus­tomers over­think ev­ery­thing, they only need the an­swer to one spe­cific ques­tion: “How can you help me to solve my prob­lem?”

In or­der to speak to this cus­tomer, you will need a de­tailed struc­ture of your prod­ucts and/or ser­vices in or­der to con­vince them to use your com­pany. You’ll have to prom­ise them that you are the best in that in­dus­try, be­cause the me­thod­i­cal cus­tomer will only use the best pos­si­ble ser­vice on the mar­ket.

Some­thing that’s very ef­fec­tive for en­gag­ing the me­thod­i­cal cus­tomer are tes­ti­mo­ni­als. How­ever, do not try to use fake tes­ti­mo­ni­als be­cause me­thod­i­cal cus­tomers will see through that trick right away. Get some tes­ti­mo­ni­als from ex­ist­ing clients and dis­play them on your land­ing page to pull me­thod­i­cal cus­tomers to­wards your busi­ness.

#4 THE HU­MAN­IS­TIC CUS­TOMER

The hu­man­is­tic cus­tomer needs to see the face be­hind a busi­ness, be­cause they need per­son­al­ity in or­der to feel they made the right de­ci­sion. To sell your com­pany to this par­tic­u­lar client you’ll need to stay true and au­then­tic.

Ques­tions the hu­man­is­tic cus­tomer will of­ten ask are: “What peo­ple have used your com­pany in the past?” and “How can your com­pany help me fix my prob­lem?”

The most ef­fec­tive land­ing page for the hu­man­is­tic cus­tomer con­tains plenty of tes­ti­mo­ni­als, writ­ten by real peo­ple. They also like to see some pic­tures with the tes­ti­mo­ni­als, to prove that they are gen­uine.

Your land­ing page must also con­tain in­for­ma­tion about you and your com­pany. Show the hu­man­is­tic cus­tomer that you care about their in­ter­ests or share a per­sonal and con­vinc­ing story.

PLAC­ING CUS­TOMERS IN CAT­E­GORIES

Plac­ing your cus­tomers in a cer­tain cat­e­gory will make your land­ing page more ef­fec­tive and trans­late into leads con­vert­ing to sales. How­ever, it’s not that easy and it re­quires a lot of re­search. To help you with deter­min­ing this ask your cur­rent cus­tomers (their mind­set will of­ten re­veal that of po­ten­tial cus­tomers) and an­a­lyse what ques­tions cus­tomers fre­quently ask you. If they fall into one of the ques­tions above, you’re pos­si­bly on your way to deter­min­ing which cat­e­gory your cus­tomers fall into.

FINE-TUNE YOUR AD­VER­TISE­MENTS

It won’t mat­ter how per­fect your land­ing page is if your ads aren’t bring­ing cus­tomers to it. Your ads will pull your cus­tomers in, so they need to match the per­son­al­ity of the cus­tomer you’re tar­get­ing. En­sure that the ti­tle and de­scrip­tion of the ad­ver­tise­ment fits the hu­man­is­tic, spon­ta­neous, com­pet­i­tive or me­thod­i­cal cus­tomer. This may re­quire some thought, but keep this con­sis­tency in your ad­ver­tise­ments and you’ll see a huge in­crease in traf­fic and con­ver­sion.

If you have cat­e­gorised your tar­get au­di­ence cor­rectly and im­ple­mented the nec­es­sary mea­sures to reel them in, your land­ing page will con­vert leads into sales be­fore you know it. Good luck!

COR­NELIUS BOERT­JENS IS MAN­AG­ING DIREC­TOR OF WEB­SITE CON­VER­SION SPE­CIAL­IST CATCHI. HIS TEAM HELPS MEDIUM TO LARGE BUSI­NESSES CON­VERT WEB­SITE TRAF­FIC INTO ON­LINE SALES AND LEADS. CATCHI HAS OF­FICES IN BOTH AUCK­LAND AND SYD­NEY AND COUNTS GE­N­E­SIS EN­ERGY, AIR NEW ZEALAND, SOUTH­ERN CROSS, UM­BREL­LAR, TICK­ETEK AND MITRE 10 AMONG ITS CUS­TOMERS. WWW.CATCHI.DIG­I­TAL

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