CROSS-WEIGHT PER­CENT­AGE

NZ Performance Car - - Weekend Workshop -

Cross-weight per­cent­age is a mea­sure of the ve­hi­cle’s di­ag­o­nal weight rel­a­tive to its to­tal weight. Cross-weight per­cent­age is cal­cu­lated in a sim­i­lar man­ner to the pre­vi­ous cal­cu­la­tions, but dif­fer­ent val­ues. Add the right front weight to the left rear weight and divide the sum by the to­tal weight of the ve­hi­cle. Cross weight is al­tered by chang­ing the ride height in each cor­ner. If you want to in­crease the weight on the right front, raise the left rear, al­ter­na­tively to de­crease the weight, lower the left rear.

Cross-weight ad­just­ments can have a huge ef­fect on the han­dling of your ve­hi­cle, par­tic­u­larly the dif­fer­ence be­tween a left- and a right-hand turn. Off­set cor­ner-weight set-ups should only be used on a cir­cuit car, as it can be very danger­ous on the street be­cause han­dling will vary when mak­ing a left or right turn due to the im­bal­ance in the cor­ner­ing force. In most cases a neu­tral bal­ance is the safest bet for most ap­pli­ca­tions any­way, with vari­ance in cir­cuit cars usu­ally re­stricted to only a few per­cent­age points ei­ther way.

WHEN IT CAME TO THE CROSS WEIGHT PER­CENT­AGE, IT WAS A LIT­TLE HARDER TO GET THIS THE PER­FECT 50%. OUR START­ING POINT WAS A LIT­TLE OFF, AND THE HONDA HAD VERY HEAVY SPRING RATES, RE­QUIR­ING A LARGE AMOUNT OF AD­JUST­MENT TO COR­RECT THE BAL­ANCE. HAD THIS BEEN A STREET CAR, THE SPRINGS WOULD HAVE BEEN A SOFTER RATE, AND IT WOULD HAVE RE­QUIRED LESS AD­JUST­MENT, AS THE WEIGHT TRANS­FER WOULD HAVE BEEN GREATER.

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