How to get three times more from your lemons

– and other bril­liantly sim­ple kitchen tips that will change your life

Daily Trust - - HOME FRONT -

SSave salty soup

im­ple! Just add a peeled and quar­tered potato. It will act as a sponge, ab­sorb­ing the ex­cess salt and won’t leave a flavour. How­ever, re­move the potato be­fore serv­ing as it’ll be far too brack­ish to eat. Adding a cup of wa­ter or a pinch of brown su­gar are al­ter­na­tives.

Res­cue burnt rice

If you burn your rice, don’t de­spair. Just re­move from the heat and place a piece of white bread on top of it for about ten min­utes. This will ex­tract and ab­sorb the burnt flavour.

The rice should be fine to eat, but be care­ful to leave the black­ened pieces on the bot­tom of the pan when serv­ing.

Gor­geous gravy

If a soup, sauce or gravy is too fatty or greasy, turn off the heat and let it sit for a few min­utes. Much of the fat will then float to the top.

Next, place a few ice cubes on the sur­face. The grease and oil in close prox­im­ity to the ice will so­lid­ify and congeal, mak­ing it eas­ier to scoop out. But be ready to re­move it quickly, as the ice cubes won’t stay frozen for long.

Get rid of onion smells

If your hands smell af­ter chop­ping onions or gar­lic, rub them on a stain­less steel spoon which will ab­sorb the odour. The sul­phur from the plants is at­tracted to and binds with one or more of the metals in the steel. Of course, wash the spoon af­ter­wards.

Re­cy­cling cook­ing oil

If you want to re-use cook­ing oil with­out the taste and smells of what was pre­vi­ously cooked in it, pour it into a fry­ing pan and heat on a low set­ting.

Care­fully add some sliced root gin­ger, let­ting the pieces soak for 15 min­utes.

At the right tem­per­a­ture, the slices should turn golden-brown very slowly. When you scoop them out, they will have ab­sorbed any flavours and odours.

Upside –down cream trick

To make cot­tage cheese, creme fraiche or sour cream last longer, store the container upside down in the fridge. This will cre­ate a vac­uum ef­fect that in­hibits the growth of bac­te­ria, which causes food to spoil. Ob­vi­ously en­sure it’s a tight­fit­ting lid first.

Never let milk boil over

sim­ply put a long-han­dled spoon into the saucepan as it heats. The spoon acts to break the sur­face ten­sion - al­low­ing the steam un­der­neath to es­cape smoothly with­out an erup­tion.

Milk of­ten boils over and spills. This is be­cause when it heats, the wa­ter in its struc­ture starts evap­o­rat­ing from the sur­face.

As a re­sult, the re­main­ing fat and pro­teins con­cen­trate into a thicker layer at the top of the pot, which even­tu­ally be­comes so thick that wa­ter vapour ris­ing through the milk can’t break through very eas­ily.

In­stead, it gets trapped, caus­ing it to ex­plode vi­o­lently. To avoid this, sim­ply put a long-han­dled spoon into the saucepan as it heats. The spoon acts to break the sur­face ten­sion — al­low­ing the steam un­der­neath to es­cape smoothly with­out an erup­tion.

Never cry cut­ting onions

Peel and cut the onion in a large bowl of wa­ter or un­der a run­ning tap. This will pre­vent the fumes which cause your eyes to wa­ter from es­cap­ing into the air.

You can also put lime juice on your knife be­fore chop­ping.

The acid re­acts with chemical com­pounds of the onion, with the re­sult that it re­leases less gas.

An­other way is to chew gum, as this makes you breathe through your mouth and not your nose, which will help re­duce the gas af­fect­ing your tear ducts.

Stop veg­etable rot­ting

Line the bot­tom of the fridge veg­etable drawer with paper tow­els which will ab­sorb the ex­cess wa­ter that causes veg­eta­bles to de­cay. Sim­i­larly with fresh herbs, put them in a sealed plas­tic bag con­tain­ing a paper towel.

Juicier lemons

A typ­i­cal lemon con­tains 3 tbsp of juice. To max­imise the amount you can squeeze, roll the fruit on a kitchen counter, ap­ply­ing light pres­sure. This bursts the tiny juice­filled cells. Al­ter­na­tively, blast for 20 sec­onds in a microwave. Then cut length­ways rather than cross­wise. You will get around three times more juice.

Zest for life: Rolling a lemon on a kitchen counter, ap­ply­ing light pres­sure, bursts the tiny juice-filled cells. Then cut length­ways rather than cross­wise. You will get around three times more juice

Keep bread fresh

Put it in a plas­tic bag with a fresh cel­ery stick and leave overnight. The loaf will slowly ab­sorb the hu­mid­ity from the cel­ery, giv­ing it a fresher taste and bounce. As the cel­ery does not have a strong flavour, it won’t af­fect the taste of the bread.

Tam­ing pep­per

Be­fore chop­ping them, rub a lit­tle veg­etable oil onto your hands. This cre­ates a bar­rier which pre­vents your skin ab­sorb­ing their fiery prop­er­ties and aroma. Be warned, though — it may make the knife slip­pery.

Also, the fastest way to de-seed a chilli is to halve it length­ways then use a tea­spoon to scrape the seeds out in one down­wards stroke.

No-waste gin­ger

With all its lumps and bumps, root gin­ger can be tricky to peel.

The so­lu­tion is not to use a peeler or knife but to gen­tly rub the skin off us­ing the back of a tea­spoon. This makes it easy to fol­low ev­ery con­tour and min­imises waste.

In­stant ice cubes

It may sound un­likely, but wa­ter that’s been boiled will freeze faster than wa­ter straight from the tap.

The rea­son is some­thing called the Mpemba ef­fect, named af­ter a Tanzanian man Erasto Mpemba who first brought this to the at­ten­tion of physi­cists.

Easy –peel gar­lic

Thump the whole bulb with the base of a saucepan to sep­a­rate the cloves. Then place them in a metal bowl and put a sim­i­lar one on top. Give the cloves a hearty shake and they should come out per­fectly peeled.

Culled from Mail On­line

Sim­ply put a long-han­dled spoon into the saucepan as it heats. The spoon acts to break the sur­face ten­sion - al­low­ing the steam un­der­neath to es­cape smoothly with­out an erup­tion

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Nigeria

© PressReader. All rights reserved.