National Herald Tribune : 2020-08-27

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in internatio­nal media, but our people are still suffering. We need the world's help more than ever to end the genocide against us in Myanmar. Close to a million Rohingya continue to live as refugees in Bangladesh, mainly in the southeaste­rn district of Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh has generously welcomed and hosted people who fled for their lives, but an overcrowde­d refugee camp is no place for a life of dignity. A whole generation of Rohingya children is growing up in deplorable conditions, with little access to education, or hope for the future. What the refugees want the most is to return home to Myanmar, but that is simply not possible today. The 600,000 Rohingya who remain in Rakhine State live in an open- air prison. Every aspect of their lives is controlled by the state: To leave one's village to attend school, to make a living or to go to a hospital usually requires special permission or a wellplaced bribe. At the moment, Myanmar is gearing up to hold a general election on November 8. It is the first vote since the historic election in 2015, when Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) won in a landslide, ending decades of direct military rule. Many Rohingya supported the NLD at that time, but have since grown bitterly disillusio­ned with the party's policies. Aung San Suu Kyi and her civilian government have proven complicit in the genocide against us by continuing to support the army's actions and denying on internatio­nal platforms what is happening on the ground. Although in the past, many Rohingya in Myanmar were able to vote and run in elections, today they are being barred from both. In 2015, Myanmar abruptly withdrew temporary citizenshi­p cards from ethnic Rohingya, which had given them the right to vote. This year, the authoritie­s have also rejected members of the Rohingya community who have tried to register to run in the elections, claiming their parents were not citizens and that they, therefore, did not meet the criteria. This is despite the fact that some of these candidates have been allowed to run in previous elections. There still is a glimmer of hope for the Rohingya, however: the momentum behind the internatio­nal justice process. Last November, the Gambia filed a case against Myanmar in the Internatio­nal Court of Justice (ICJ), accusing it of committing genocide against the Rohingya. A few days later, the Internatio­nal Criminal Court announced that it was launching an investigat­ion into the Myanmar military for crimes against humanity. In January this year, the ICJ ordered Myanmar to end genocidal practices against the Rohingya, and to report regularly on how it complies with these orders. But even though the government has claimed it was improving conditions in Rakhine State since, in reality, almost nothing has changed. If anything, conditions have become even worse this year for the Rohingya, as fighting between the military and armed groups has intensifie­d while the pandemic has swept through the region. My own organisati­on, the Burmese Rohingya Organisati­on UK, has also brought a case against Aung San Suu Kyi, her government and the military before the Argentinia­n judiciary. It relies on the principle of universal jurisdicti­on - the notion that some heinous crimes can be tried anywhere, regardless of where they took place. But for these efforts to be effective, we need the internatio­nal community's support. We have spent the past three years telling the world about our plight and telling the same stories over and over again. In return, we have received little more than sympathy and empty promises. The world has failed to take concrete action to help the Rohingya. Despite the overwhelmi­ng evidence against Myanmar of their crimes, our reality is the same - Rohingya are suffering, whether in villages in Rakhine State or in refugee camps in Bangladesh. The UN Security Council has remained paralysed for three years, failing to condemn Myanmar. The US and the EU have imposed individual sanctions on members of the security forces, but they do not go far enough in pressuring the military leadership. They have also refused to use the term "genocide", in part because that would bring with it some legal obligation­s to act. Rohingya are only asking for an opportunit­y to live a life of dignity in our own country. The oppression that has rendered us stateless and prisoners in our own homes must end immediatel­y. Those responsibl­e for the violence against us must be held to account to prevent it from ever happening again. These are big but far from impossible tasks - history shows that genocidal regimes do not last long. One year from now, on the next anniversar­y, I hope we will have gotten closer to making this a reality. exactly three years since the Myanmar military poured into Rakhine State and launched a vicious operation against the Rohingya people. Over the course of a few weeks, thousands of women, men and children were killed, mutilated and raped, whole villages were burned to the ground, and hundreds of thousands fled into neighbouri­ng Bangladesh. Even for us Rohingya, who have been oppressed and rendered stateless in our home country for decades, the savagery of the violence in 2017 was unpreceden­ted. Today, our plight has mostly disappeare­d from the headlines behind the mayhem, suspected of being members of Iranian-backed militias. Good luck! These militias are wellentren­ched groups who play an outsize role in Iraqi politics and the government’s own underfunde­d, undertrain­ed security forces are no match to them. They embrace a rigid, intolerant vision of social order backed by the menacing threat that those in opposition to that vision should be, well, offed. What kind of statement is that making about the fabric of communal life in Iraq? It shouldn’t take a social scientist to remind us that in a social system, intoleranc­e is guaranteed to build not bridges but walls among citizens, leading inexorably to a fractured body politic. Ms Yacoob was not unlike countless other activists who took to the streets late last year, before the Covid-19 pandemic reached Iraq, to injured thousands in last year’s demonstrat­ions, effectivel­y did just that: They evinced fear of the value, the power of ideas in human affairs, feat of how it is the life of the mind that, at the end of the day, enriches our human being and thrusts us beyond our fixed meaning. Those who ordered the hit on Ms Yacoob did not see her as a petite, bespectacl­ed 29year-old physician, but as an engaged reformist with ideas relevant to — indeed ideas that are a necessary function of — the emergence of a stable, prosperous, pluralisti­c society in Iraq. To these zealots, imbued as they are with a doctrinair­e view of the world, she was a danger to the paradigm they embraced. So off with her. To the rest of us, however, offing a reformist is a crime most foul, as it were, a crime against the very foundation of what constitute­s a civilised society. express their anger at pervasive corruption, high unemployme­nt, dismal public services and foreign interventi­on in the country via local elements whose loyalties to nation are ancillary to those of sect. Silenced for her ideas She was part of the adversaria­l current in society, made up of individual­s whose necessary role in social life is to seek an articulati­on of the fragile plurality of human nature and conduct. Come to think of it, to kill someone because you disagree with their views is an act suffused with irony. For by doing that you pay tribute — a sinister tribute to be exact, but tribute neverthele­ss — to the value, indeed to the power of ideas in human affairs. Those who assassinat­ed Ms Yacoob and her two other fellow activists, and those security forces and gunmen with links to militias who shot to death well over 500 protesters and Mean while, back in Basra — in Iraqi folklore, the port poets, writers, philosophe­rs city from which Sinbad the and theologian­s — Sailor, the fictional demonstrat­ors last week, Baghdadi mariner in A outraged at news of the Thousand and One Nights, assassinat­ions, torched the set out on his seven voyages local parliament building throughout the seas, during and the headquarte­rs of a the Abbasid Caliphate, and number of Iran-backed the city that in its heyday in groups, demanding a thorough the 8th and 9th centuries investigat­ion. Noted was a brilliant cultural centre, home to noted philologis­ts, again, good luck! As for the rest of Iraq, well, the nation remains in suspended animation, where new government­s are started and nothing begins, diffuse restlessne­ss among the populace reigns and ordinary Iraqis feel, if only viscerally, that the future perfect has somehow disappeare­d as a tense in the grammar of their national being. Sad, no? history has always had a pungent associatio­n for Arabs, fondly known by them as the “land between the two rivers”, does not appear to have recovered from the unintended consequenc­es of the 2003 the American invasion. In short, it is a nation not yet fully healed. The latest reminder of this fact is the wanton assassinat­ion of activists in Basra last week. Among those was that of Rihan Yacoob, a 29-yearold doctor who had led local antigovern­ment protests there. She was shot dead by unidentifi­ed gunmen who opened fire on her car with an assault rifle and then took off on the back of a motorcycle. Her death came several days after the assassinat­ion of Tahseen Osama, another Basra activist. On September 18 yet another high profile figure in the protest movement, Saud Ali, was shot dead in a street downtown. (Lest we forget, the murder of Yacoub and Osama came just over a month after the brazen assassinat­ion of prominent political commentato­r Hisham AlHashimi in Baghdad.) Iraq’s prime minister, Mostafa Al-Kadhimi, expressed his distress, and vowed to do “everything necessary” to have the security forces apprehend “the outlaws” IN THE COURT OF Mr.Naveed Ahmad JUDGE BANKING COURT-II, DistrictCo­urts Gujranwala SUMMONS U/S 9(5) OF THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIO­N (RECORVERY OF FINANCES) ORDINANCE 2001 (ORDINANCE NO.XLVIOF 2001) Suit No. 292/2020 Z.T.B.L Vs Sohava s/o Malla caste Bhatti r/o Thatha Raika TehsilPind­iBhattian Distt. Hafizabad. W hereas, the aforesaid plaintiff has instituted a suit against you and other for the recovery ofRs.318000/-along with mark up / Interest and cost etc claimed to be payable by you. A summon U/S 9(5)ofOrdinanc­e No. XLVI of 2001 referred to above is here by issued requiring you to make within 30 days ofthe proclamati­on in newspapera­n applicatio­n for leave to defend the suit in the form ofwritten statementU/S 10 of the said Ordinance.Take notice that on yourfailur­e to file such applicatio­n within time specified above the Banking Courtshall­pass a decree as Prayed for in the Plaints in the favour of the plaintiff Banking Company.Nextdate forfurther­proceeding­s, in the case has been fixed on 05-9-2020 given undermy hand and the sealofthe courton this 7-8-2020. IN THE COURT OF Mr.Naveed Ahmad JUDGE BANKING COURT-II, DistrictCo­urts Gujranwala SUMMONS U/S 9(5) OF THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIO­N (RECORVERY OF FINANCES) ORDINANCE 2001 (ORDINANCE NO.XLVIOF 2001) Suit No. 325/2020 Z.T.B.L Vs Tanveer Abbas s/o Muhammad Anwarcaste Dhudhalr/o RaiChand Tehsil& Distt.Hafizabad.W hereas, the aforesaid plaintiffh­as instituted a suitagains­tyou and otherforth­e recovery ofRs.275000 along with mark up / Interest and cost etc claimed to be payable by you. A summon U/S 9(5)ofOrdinanc­e No. XLVI of 2001 referred to above is here by issued requiring you to make within 30 days ofthe proclamati­on in newspapera­n applicatio­n for leave to defend the suit in the form ofwritten statementU/S 10 of the said Ordinance.Take notice that on yourfailur­e to file such applicatio­n within time specified above the Banking Courtshall­pass a decree as Prayed for in the Plaints in the favour of the plaintiff Banking Company.Nextdate forfurther­proceeding­s, in the case has been fixed on 05-9-2020 given undermy hand and the sealofthe courton this 7-8-2020. GENERALPUB­LIC NOTICE Itis to inform public atlarge that my clientKhaw­aja Awais Maqsood S/o. Khawaja Maqsood-ul-Hassan resident of 17-C, Gulberg III, Lahore has entered into an agreement to sell (as purchaser) with owner s 1.Sh.Muhammad Shahid 2. Sh. Muhammad Zahid. 3. Sh. Muhammad Tahir sons of Sh. Muhammad Aslam 4.SamiFayaz son of Muhammad Fayaz 5. Muhammad Zubair son of Mian Muhammad Rashid on 24.08.2020 regarding shop No. 18-G, measuring 579 SQFT. Situated at ground floor, ICone Center 48Shahra-e-Quaid-e-Azam the Mall Lahore.If any person/persons, organizati­on, bank or any institutio­n having any claim/objection aboutthis property orpartin shap of agreement, sale deed, gift deed, debt, possession, loan, trust,etc.W hatsoevers­hould contact undersigne­d within one week ofthis notice /Add.Failing which any claim or objection shall be deemed to have been waived and transactio­ns ofSale deed shallbe completed in favourofmy client. Mian AsgharMahm ood Advocate High Court 136-P, MiniMarket­Gulberg II Lahore 0314423666­6, 0333448877­9 IN THE COURT OF Mr.Naveed Ahmad JUDGE BANKING COURT-II, DistrictCo­urts Gujranwala SUMMONS U/S 9(5) OF THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIO­N (RECORVERY OF FINANCES) ORDINANCE 2001 (ORDINANCE NO.XLVIOF 2001) Suit No. 321/2020 Z.T.B.L Vs Zahid Iqbal s/o Muhammad Ali (deceased) through heirs, 1aKubra Bibiwidow, 1b- AbdulHadi (Son) 1c- Ayesha Fatima 1d- Iqra Parveen 1e- Maryam Fatima daughters caste Gillallr/o AliAbad Tehsil& Distt.Hafizabad.W hereas, the aforesaid plaintiffh­as instituted a suitagains­tyou and otherforth­e recovery ofRs.570,000 along with mark up / Interest and cost etc claimed to be payable by you. A summon U/S 9(5)ofOrdinanc­e No. XLVI of 2001 referred to above is here by issued requiring you to make within 30 days ofthe proclamati­on in newspapera­n applicatio­n for leave to defend the suit in the form ofwritten statementU/S 10 of the said Ordinance.Take notice that on yourfailur­e to file such applicatio­n within time specified above the Banking Courtshall­pass a decree as Prayed for in the Plaints in the favour of the plaintiff Banking Company.Nextdate forfurther­proceeding­s, in the case has been fixed on 05-9-2020 given undermy hand and the sealofthe courton this 7-8-2020. IN THE COURT OF Mr.Naveed Ahmad JUDGE BANKING COURT-II, DistrictCo­urts Gujranwala SUMMONS U/S 9(5) OF THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIO­N (RECORVERY OF FINANCES) ORDINANCE 2001 (ORDINANCE NO.XLVIOF 2001) Suit No. 312/2020 Z.T.B.L Vs Muhamamd Irfan s/o Sher Muhammad caste Bhatti r/o Raja Tarar Tehsil & Distt. Hafizabad. W hereas,the aforesaid plaintiffh­as instituted a suit against you and otherforth­e recovery ofRs.318000 along with mark up / Interest and costetc claimed to be payable by you. A summon U/S 9(5) of Ordinance No. XLVI of 2001 referred to above is here by issued requiring you to make within 30 days ofthe proclamati­on in newspapera­n applicatio­n for leave to defend the suitin the form ofwritten statement U/S 10 ofthe said Ordinance.Take notice thaton yourfailur­e to file such applicatio­n within time specified above the Banking Courtshall­pass a decree asPrayed forin the Plaints in the favourofth­e plaintiffB­anking Company.Nextdate forfurther­proceeding­s, in the case has been fixed on 05-9-2020 given undermy hand and the sealofthe courton this 7-8-2020. INF(P) 3120/20 OUR FAITH, CORRUPTION FREE PAKISTAN National Herald Tribune, Thursday, August 27, 2020

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