Ra­toon­ing can make ma­ture okra pro­duc­tive again

A YOUNG and en­er­getic grad­u­at­ing agri­cul­ture stu­dent found out that ra­toon­ing can make ma­ture okra ( Abel­moscus es­cu­len­tus L.) plants pro­duc­tive again.

Agriculture - - Contents - BY JULIO P. YAP, JR.

In a study, An­gelou Toledo Ca­lope, a scholar at the De La Salle Araneta Univer­sity in Sa­likneta Farm, Up­per Ciudad Real, City of San Jose del Monte, Bu­la­can, de­ter­mined that ra­tooned ma­ture okra plants fer­til­ized with ver­mi­com­post and sup­ple­mented with a fo­liar fer­til­izer through dif­fer­ent meth­ods and rates of ap­pli­ca­tion pro­duced vi­able re­sults.

Ra­toon­ing is a method that in­volves prun­ing the plants back to sev­eral inches above the soil line to en­cour­age new growth with rein­vig­o­rated flow­er­ing and pod pro­duc­tion.

Re­sults of the study re­vealed that the ap­pli­ca­tion of Amino Plus Fo­liar Fer­til­izer, ei­ther through fo­liar spray­ing or soil drench­ing that sup­ple­mented the ver­mi­com­post, in­duced flow­er­ing within 21 days af­ter ra­toon­ing or cut­ting of the ma­ture (but un­pro­duc­tive) okra plants.

Like­wise, ra­tooned okra plants sig­nif­i­cantly pro­duced the high­est mar­ketable yield per plot.

METHOD­OL­OGY In his study, Ca­lope used a sin­gle fac­tor ex­per­i­ment with five treat­ments and three repli­ca­tions ar­ranged in Ran­dom­ized Com­plete Block De­sign (RCBD) in an area of about 50 square me­ters of land that was pre­vi­ously planted with okra.

The area was di­vided into five rows of 10-me­ter (m) lengths with .50-m dis­tances in be­tween rows. Each row was fur­ther sub­di­vided into three rows of three me­ters length with 0.50 m dis­tances be­tween rows to serve as blocks. Also, each row con­sisted of 10 ex­per­i­men­tal plants with a 30-cen­time­ter (cm) plant­ing dis­tance be­tween hills.

RA­TOON­ING Ca­lope used six-month-old okra plants in his study. He says the ma­ture okra plants were pruned to about 20-cm from the soil base us­ing prun­ing shears.

Af­ter the ex­per­i­men­tal plants were pruned, they were ran­domly ar­ranged into 15 plots. Each plot had 10 ra­tooned

An­gelou Toledo Ca­lope, a scholar at the De La Salle Araneta Univer­sity in Sa­likneta Farm, Up­per Ciudad Real, City of San Jose del Monte, Bu­la­can, proudly poses be­side his ra­tooned ma­ture okra plants.

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