CON­SER­VA­TION STA­TUS

Animal Scene - - ANIMALS 101 -

The IUCN lists the blue-naped par­rot as a Near Threat­ened species, cit­ing loss of habi­tat due to agri­cul­tural ex­pan­sion and log­ging and trap­ping for bird trade as the rea­sons for the de­cline in its pop­u­la­tion. A fur­ther de­crease in pop­u­la­tion may lead to its re-cat­e­go­riza­tion as a Threat­ened species, which is sub­clas­si­fied into Vul­ner­a­ble, En­dan­gered, and Crit­i­cally En­dan­gered, depend­ing on the grav­ity of the threat to its ex­tinc­tion. Data re­gard­ing its pop­u­la­tion in the wild is out­dated—es­ti­mates range from 2,500 to 10,000 in­di­vid­u­als—and his­tor­i­cal records show that the num­bers have di­min­ished dras­ti­cally from over a cen­tury ago, when the birds were com­monly found on most Philip­pine is­lands. While the species is ex­tinct in some is­lands and con­sid­ered rare in oth­ers, Birdlife In­ter­na­tional notes that “it is still fairly nu­mer­ous in some ar­eas of Palawan and Tawi-tawi.” Katala Foun­da­tion, through its South­ern Palawan An­tiPoach­ing Ini­tia­tive, has been work­ing to­wards sta­bi­liz­ing and in­creas­ing the pop­u­la­tion of the blue-naped par­rot in the Mu­nic­i­pal­ity of Rizal.

The Con­ven­tion on In­ter­na­tional Trade in En­dan­gered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in­cludes the blue-naped par­rot in Ap­pen­dix II, which iden­ti­fies “species not nec­es­sar­ily threat­ened with ex­tinc­tion, but in which trade must be con­trolled in or­der to avoid uti­liza­tion in­com­pat­i­ble with their sur­vival.” As a Party to the Con­ven­tion, the Philip­pines must abide by CITES reg­u­la­tions: in­ter­na­tional trade for Ap­pen­dix II species is only al­lowed to par­ties granted ex­port per­mits or re­ex­port cer­tifi­cates, pro­vided that trade is not detri­men­tal to the sur­vival of the species. In ad­di­tion, the blue-naped par­rot is pro­tected by the reg­u­la­tions enu­mer­ated in RA 9147 or the “Wildlife Re­sources Con­ser­va­tion and Pro­tec­tion Act,” which was signed into law on July 30, 2001. Birds con­fis­cated from poach­ers and illegal traders, along with those turned in by the public, are brought to the Wildlife Res­cue and Re­search Cen­ter at the Ni­noy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Na­ture Cen­ter. Con­ser­va­tion ac­tions are un­der­way in na­tional parks lo­cated in Bataan, Que­zon, and Mi­nalun­gaw, and in Puerto Princesa Subter­ranean River Na­tional Park.

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