Big money in Mes­tiza am­palaya

Manila Bulletin - - Agriculture News -

Anum­ber of farm­ers from Pam­panga are reap­ing high yield and big prof­its from their crops of Mes­tiza am­palaya, a new hy­brid re­leased for com­mer­cial plant­ing three years ago by East-West Seed.

Mes­tiza has now be­come a fa­vorite of farm­ers for a num­ber of good rea­sons. For one, it is high-yield­ing and the fruits are mostly Class A, thus com­mand­ing a high price in the mar­ket. The va­ri­ety is also re­sis­tant to Na­ma­ma­rako, a se­ri­ous dis­ease that is said to be a cu­cur­bit aphid-borne yel­low virus. The fruits also have a good shelf life. The light green color is an­other char­ac­ter­is­tic fa­vored by con­sumers. Ac­cord­ing to Ric Reyes of East-West, con­sumers per­ceive that light green am­palaya fruits are less bit­ter than the dark green va­ri­eties.

One fel­low who made mil­lions of pe­sos from his Mes­tiza crop planted on 7,000 square me­ters, is Os­car Manalansan, 59, of Brgy. San­ti­ago, Lubao, Pam­panga. In Septem­ber 2016, he planted Mes­tiza on 7,000 square me­ters. About 43 days later, he started har­vest­ing from his plants. Ac­cord­ing to him, he made a to­tal of 16 har­vests, each har­vest av­er­ag­ing 2,500 ki­los of mostly Class A fruits.

Be­cause it was an off-sea­son crop and the sup­ply was lim­ited, Manalansan en­joyed a high price of P80 per kilo. There were also times when the price reached P100 per kilo. Be­cause of his big in­come, he was able to build a new house in Calan­gain, Lubao.

Rodolfo Manalansan, a brother of Os­car, also plants Mes­tiza am­palaya be­sides other va­ri­eties from East-West like D-Max tomato, Django fin­ger pep-

BEAU­TI­FUL MES­TIZA AM­PALAYA FRUITS – Photo shows the fruits of Mes­tiza am­palaya which are 30 to 35 cm long and with a di­am­e­ter of 5-6 cm. The va­ri­ety ma­tures in 42 to 45 days from plant­ing and can be pro­duc­tive for the next two months. Most of the fruits are first class and the color is light green, a char­ac­ter­is­tic that many con­sumers pre­fer be­cause they be­lieve that the light green fruits are less bit­ter than the dark green fruits.

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