PH leads in gen­der equal­ity in As­pac

Manila Bulletin - - Front Page - By BERNIE CAHILES-MAGKILAT

The Philip­pines, tra­di­tion­ally a ma­tri­ar­chal and egal­i­tar­ian so­ci­ety, leads Asia Pa­cific on gen­der equal­ity in work with sig­nif­i­cant op­por­tu­nity of achiev­ing gen­der par­ity that could add $40 bil­lion to an­nual GDP by 2025, or 7 per­cent above the busi­ness-as-usual GDP, a new re­port on gen­der equal­ity re­vealed.

McKin­sey & Com­pany’s new re­port on the Power of Par­ity: Ad­vanc­ing Women’s Equal­ity in Asia Pa­cific showed the Philip­pines lead­ing de­spite con­tin­u­ing some weak­nesses in gen­der equal­ity in the so­ci­ety.

McKin­sey & Com­pany Manag­ing Part­ner for the Philip­pines Kris­tine Ro­mano said that if the Philip­pines re­in­forced op­por­tu­ni­ties for higher-in­come women and ex­tended them to poorer women, it could add $40 bil­lion to an­nual GDP in 2025, or 7 per­cent above busi­ness-as-usual GDP.

“The Philip­pines has al­ready made sig­nif­i­cant ad­vances to­wards gen­der par­ity and has es­tab­lished a solid foun­da­tion on which to build fur­ther progress,” said Ro­mano stress­ing that the next chal­lenge is to sup­port lower-in­come women to make the most of their eco­nomic po­ten­tial, pur­sue ca­reers that will earn them higher wages, and give them the sup­port and flex­i­bil­ity they need.

McKin­sey Global In­sti­tute (MGI), the busi­ness and eco­nom­ics re­search arm of McKin­sey & Com­pany, has cal­cu­lated a Gen­der Par­ity Score (GPS) for all Asia Pa­cific coun­tries us­ing 15 in­di­ca­tors of gen­der equal­ity in work and three types of gen­der equal­ity in so­ci­ety: es­sen­tial ser­vices and en­ablers of eco­nomic op­por­tu­nity, le­gal pro­tec­tion and po­lit­i­cal voice; and phys­i­cal se­cu­rity and au­ton­omy.

The Philip­pines has low gen­der in­equal­ity on six out of 15 in­di­ca­tors, but high or ex­tremely high in­equal­ity on four. It has a GPS of 0.73 on gen­der equal­ity in work — the best in re­gion —

and sig­nif­i­cantly fur­ther ahead of the Asia Pa­cific av­er­age (0.44).

On es­sen­tial ser­vices and en­ablers of eco­nomic op­por­tu­nity, the Philip­pines’ GPS is 0.91, some­what ahead of the Asia Pa­cific av­er­age of 0.85 but a lit­tle short of the best in re­gion at 0.96.

On le­gal pro­tec­tion, the Philip­pines has a GPS of 0.51, well ahead of the re­gional av­er­age (0.32), but a lit­tle be­hind the best in re­gion (0.66). On phys­i­cal se­cu­rity and au­ton­omy, the Philip­pines scores 0.90, ahead of the re­gional av­er­age of 0.82, but a lit­tle be­hind the best in re­gion at 0.96.

Across Asia Pa­cific, if all coun­tries were to match the rate of im­prove­ment of the fastest im­prov­ing coun­try in the re­gion, $4.5 tril­lion a year could be added to the re­gion’s GDP by 2025, or 12 per­cent above busi­nes­sas-usual GDP.

Based on the study, the Philip­pines has an op­por­tu­nity to build on its strengths in women’s rep­re­sen­ta­tion in pro­fes­sional and tech­ni­cal jobs, and in busi­ness lead­er­ship.

Over­all, women are rel­a­tively em­pow­ered eco­nom­i­cally in the Philip­pines — a tra­di­tion­ally ma­tri­ar­chal and egal­i­tar­ian so­ci­ety — and this is a strength on which to build.

The re­port fur­ther cited the Na­tional De­mo­graphic and Health Sur­vey in 2013 which said that ma­jor­ity of mar­ried women make all the ma­jor house­hold de­ci­sions in­di­vid­u­ally or jointly with their hus­bands.

The Philip­pines is the re­gion’s best per­former on women’s rep­re­sen­ta­tion in pro­fes­sional and tech­ni­cal jobs, which ap­pears to re­flect high ed­u­ca­tional at­tain­ment among Filip­inas.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Philippines

© PressReader. All rights reserved.