AS­PI­RA­TION/ IN­SPI­RA­TION/ IN­NO­VA­TION

In­no­va­tive tex­tures, on-trend colours, in­tu­itive prod­ucts, last­ing or budge-proof for­mu­las, and de­signer-sleek pack­ag­ing. This is the rein­ven­tion of Shi­seido Makeup.

Herworld (Singapore) - - CONTENTS - – JE

The re­boot of Shi­seido Makeup; Ugg footwear makes an­other come­back; and the SG gin that’s fi­nally made in SG.

Baby boomers who grew up with Shi­seido have al­ways known that the brand – which is 145 now – has al­ways been pro­gres­sive and in­no­va­tive; a game changer even be­fore the phrase be­came fash­ion­able to toss around. It was one of the first (if not the first) to stress the im­por­tance of prep­ping skin with mois­ture, us­ing a soft­en­ing lo­tion prior to other skin­care. It was the first to pay as much at­ten­tion to the light­ness of a sun­screen as its ef­fi­cacy. And when it came to base makeup – from foun­da­tion and loose pow­der to con­cealer with the most re­fined tex­tures – be­fore the South Korean cush­ion boom, Shi­seido was un­touch­able.

That her­itage may have been lost on the younger gen­er­a­tion, but it res­onated with Jill Scala­man­dre, who now heads a team at the Shi­seido Global Makeup Cen­tre of Ex­cel­lence (MCOE). The team is tasked with re­boot­ing Shi­seido – start­ing with its makeup.

Scala­man­dre is the pres­i­dent of MCOE. The lat­ter is one of four cen­tres of ex­cel­lence set up by the Ja­panese brand “to cre­ate a col­lab­o­ra­tive, cross-bor­der way of think­ing”. In short, it aims to stay rel­e­vant and evolve as a player with a global view in to­day’s hy­per-crowded mar­ket. MCOE, which over­sees the makeup divi­sion, is one of two cen­tres in New York; the other is in charge of dig­i­tal growth. Two more cen­tres are in Tokyo and Paris for skin­care and fra­grances re­spec­tively.

The cen­tre in the USA was picked to lead in makeup be­cause the coun­try is “a melt­ing pot of eth­nic­i­ties and the largest con­sumer of makeup”, says Scala­man­dre. “An in­cred­i­ble amount of in­sights and data here al­lows us to know that what we are cre­at­ing to­day is what the con­sumer of to­mor­row wants and needs.”

From Shi­seido’s rich his­tory, Scala­man­dre mined the func­tional level of the brand’s mas­tery of sci­ence and tex­ture. “When you touch a skin­care prod­uct from Shi­seido, the sen­so­rial ex­pe­ri­ence is truly un­par­al­leled,” she says. “So we knew we had to bring th­ese in­no­va­tive tex­tures to the world of makeup.”

Tex­ture be­came the spring­board for the first part of the brand’s over­haul: Let it do all the talk­ing and wow­ing.

And th­ese tex­tures do wow. They don’t just gen­er­ate so­cial me­dia buzz and give in­stant grat­i­fi­ca­tion to makeup fans and ex­perts; they are also the kind that makeup novices are grate­ful for, not in­tim­i­dated by.

The 137 items, cat­e­gorised un­der four tex­tures – Dew, Gel, Pow­der, Ink – are, says Gail Boye, se­nior vi­cepres­i­dent of Global Prod­uct De­vel­op­ment for Shi­seido Makeup, “reimag­ined and re­de­fined for the eyes, lips and face. All are light­weight and last­ing, with boldim­pact colour. While I can’t com­ment on brands out­side of Shi­seido, I know that the ini­tial re­sponse to de­vel­op­ing a range cen­tred around four key tex­tures has been over­whelm­ingly pos­i­tive, and some­thing the con­sumer wants to ex­pe­ri­ence more”.

“We are tak­ing an in­no­va­tive ap­proach to makeup that no other brand has ever done be­fore,” says Scala­man­dre. “The fo­cal point of the range isn’t sim­ply the ex­tra­or­di­nary colours or its in­cred­i­ble per­for­mance, but the unique, sen­so­rial tex­tures. By fus­ing two of Shi­seido’s key pil­lars, art and sci­ence, and tak­ing in­spi­ra­tion from mod­ern Ja­panese cul­ture, fash­ion, and de­sign, we have reimag­ined what beauty looks and feels like to­day.”

Well, since its world­wide launch on Sept 1, “beauty reimag­ined” looks like ev­ery­thing it should be for to­day’s ex­cit­ing, spon­ta­neous, rel­e­vant, ir­rev­er­ent, dar­ing, ex­per­i­men­tal and in­clu­sive makeup space. Yet it feels, well, like noth­ing – lit­er­ally and fig­u­ra­tively. Re­gard­less of which item you pick from the four tex­tures, ev­ery­thing glides on and melds with the skin like the two are one (even if you don’t have per­fect skin or skill), while pro­vid­ing colour or ef­fect that won’t slide or melt away. And all the eye makeup is ev­ery­thing ev­ery woman (young or older) wants – it’s easy to ap­ply, easy to use, easy to nav­i­gate, and stays on like a dream.

Shi­seido Makeup is just phase 1. Phase 2, which will be the rein­ven­tion of the brand’s base makeup, is slated for Septem­ber 2019. We think a lot of peo­ple will be stay­ing tuned.

Six in­ter­na­tional In­sta-makeup artists/ in­flu­encers were re­cruited to tar­get a younger au­di­ence for Shi­seido Makeup. Called the Global Artist Col­lec­tive, they’re led by Asian Amer­i­can Global Color Artist Patrick Ta (@patrickta, 1.1 mil­lion fol­low­ers), who has A-list celebs as fans and clients (Kendall Jen­ner, Kim Kar­dashian West, Gigi and Bella Ha­did, Ar­i­ana Grande, Rita Ora and Priyanka Cho­pra are among them). South Korean Youtube phe­nom­e­non Pony (@ponys­makeup, 5.5 mil­lion fol­low­ers), is the brand’s Asi­aPa­cific am­bas­sador.

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