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HWM (Singapore) - - CONTENTS - Pho­tog­ra­phy by Ja­van g Edited by Mar­cus Wong

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Pho­tog­ra­pher Ja­van Ng !nds lots of in­spi­ra­tion in cities, as he !nds the dra­matic col­li­sion of peo­ple and ar­chi­tec­ture gives each city a unique essence and ex­is­tence. To him, there are photo op­por­tu­ni­ties any­time, any­where, so he’s bring­ing you !ve tips for get­ting the most out of your Ur­ban Pho­tog­ra­phy.

TAKE AD­VAN­TAGE OF RE­FLEC­TIONS

R elec­tions are every­where in mod­ern cities. You and them on build­ing glass fa­cades, lakes, rivers and even wa­ter pud­dles on the streets. Ja­van loves us­ing beau­ti­ful re­flec­tive qual­i­ties in his com­po­si­tions to cre­ate won­der­ful ef­fects, and rec­om­mends you try this tech­nique to make shots that are dis­tinctly your own.

This photo was taken at twi­light at the Art-Sci­ence Mu­seum in Sin­ga­pore. Ja­van walked around the lily pond and got down to al­most wa­ter level to and just the right com­po­si­tion with the per­fect re­flec­tion. Plac­ing his cam­era and lens as close to the edge of the pond as pos­si­ble, he took a long ex­po­sure.

In Light­room, he rrst pulled down the high­lights and whites of the im­age to bal­ance the over­all tone. Next, he brought up the shad­ows in the photo to brighten the darker por­tions of the im­age. The re­duc­tion of high­lights and the bright­en­ing of shad­ows left the im­age lack­ing in con­trast, so Ja­van ad­justed the tone curve ac­cord­ingly with a sim­ple S-Curve to bring back some of the punch.

SHOOT FROM LOW AN­GLES TO GET A WHOLE NEW PER­SPEC­TIVE

T his im­age was taken when Ja­van was ex­plor­ing Cir­cu­lar Quay in Syd­ney, Aus­tralia. Walk­ing to­ward Syd­ney Har­bour Bridge, Ja­van spot­ted this small pud­dle of wa­ter next to the curb at the back of the Over­seas Pas­sen­ger Ter­mi­nal, so he crouched down and used the live view mode to frame the shot, giv­ing a worm’s eye view of the world, but not be­fore some­one walked into his frame. That added an in­ter­est­ing sub­ject to his shot be­sides the Har­bour Bridge.

While edit­ing in Light­room, Ja­van used heal­ing brush mode in the spot re­moval tool to re­move the steel beam that was stick­ing out in the top right cor­ner of the frame. He also ad­justed the white bal­ance, con­trast and ex­po­sure to bring out the mid-day warm tones. Then, he brought the high­lights down and the shad­ows up to show the de­tails of the bridge and the re­flec­tion, Fin­ish­ing by adding a bit of clar­ity and vi­brance to the im­age.

GO IN­DOORS AND GO BLACK AND WHITE FOR AN EX­TRA UR­BAN LOOK

U rban pho­tog­ra­phy is not just re­stricted to out­doors. You can cap­ture some great in­door scenes too. Whether it’s an of­fce lobby, mu­seum, shop­ping cen­tre or even the lo­cal train sta­tion, there are of­ten shots to be had. Ja­van took this sub­way photo when he was liv­ing in New York. To cap­ture the bustling and fast pace of New York City sub­way com­muters, he used a slower shut­ter speed of 1/25s to show a bit of the move­ment from the com­muters com­ing out of the sub­way train.

And noth­ing says city quite like a black and white photo. To give his photo a high im­pact, ur­ban feel­ing, Ja­van turned it black and white in Light­room. He brought the high­lights down and the shad­ows up. Next, he added con­trast and clar­ity to the im­age. He also used the tone curves to fur­ther en­hance the con­trast of the im­age. To pull his view­ers to the cen­ter of the im­age and to en­hance the mood, he used the vi­gnette tool to darken the edges of the im­age.

BAD WEATHER PRESENTS GREAT PHOTO OP­POR­TU­NI­TIES

J avan loves cap­tur­ing im­ages dur­ing bad weather. Be it rain or snow, these weather con­di­tions present great photo op­por­tu­ni­ties just wait­ing to be cap­tured. Rainy days can add drama and a sense of mood­i­ness to your im­ages, trans­form­ing or­di­nary ur­ban­scapes into mys­te­ri­ous and unique set­tings.

He took this photo on a wet day at Ma­rina Bay in Sin­ga­pore. To keep his gear dry, he found a shel­tered spot at Ma­rina Bay Sands over­look­ing Ma­rina Bay’s sky­scrapers. Ja­van also wanted to in­clude a pop of color on a gloomy day, so he waited for some­one with a bright colored um­brella to walk into his frame.

To bring out the de­tails in the clouds, he brought the high­lights down in Light­room. He also added a bit of clar­ity and bright­ened the im­age by bring­ing the shad­ows up and ad­justed the whites in Light­room to achieve a soft and brighter fore­ground.

DIS­COVER SYM­ME­TRY IN YOUR SUR­ROUND­INGS.

C ities are full of sym­me­try – where there is so much ar­chi­tec­ture – it’s every­where. Use the ur­ban sym­me­try in your city to highlight the sub­ject of your pho­tos and strengthen your com­po­si­tion.

This im­age was taken un­der the Es­planade Bridge in Sin­ga­pore. Us­ing the sym­me­try of the bridge, Ja­van waited for an in­ter­est­ing sub­ject to come into his frame be­fore he snapped the photo. He ex­posed by me­ter­ing for the sky­scraper and sky. This helps him keep de­tails in the sky and yet still have some de­tails in the dark ar­eas un­der the bridge.

In Light­room, Javen pulled the high­lights down to bring out the de­tails in the sky and re­cov­ered the de­tails in dark ar­eas by bring­ing the shad­ows and whites up. Us­ing the ra­dial lter, he bright­ened up his sub­ject (the fe­male cy­clist) a bit. He also added a bit of clar­ity and ad­justed the curves to fur­ther ac­cen­tu­ate the whites and blacks for a more con­trast­ing look.

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