BE NOT AFRAID

Huang Yux­ing uses his trade­mark kalei­do­scopic style to ex­plore the con­cept of life in his lat­est solo ex­hi­bi­tion.

Robb Report Singapore - - Art & Design - By CORINNE KERK

At just 41, Chi­nese artist Huang Yux­ing is a ris­ing star in the con­tem­po­rary art world, cap­ti­vat­ing ad­mir­ers of his works with what is de­scribed as an ex­pres­sion­ist style in his paint­ings.

Since the Beijing-born artist grad­u­ated from the Mu­ral Depart­ment of China’s renowned Cen­tral Academy of Fine Arts in 2000, he has de­vel­oped his craft through mul­ti­ple se­ries of works that ex­plore his own emo­tions and ex­pe­ri­ences.

His paint­ings a re ab­stract, fea­tur­ing mostly a de­con­struc­tion of ev­ery­day forms ren­dered in colour­ful geo­met­ric shapes and bril­liant hues.

At his ex­hi­bi­tion in Hong Kong’s Ga­lerie Per­rotin – the artist’s first solo show with the gallery, which runs till 15 October – he is dis­tant and cheer­less in de­meanour, yet earnest and con­tem­pla­tive in his re­sponse.

The 14 pieces on show – ev­ery one al­ready sold – is each an­chored by its own nar­ra­tive, yet held to­gether by a com­mon thread, as ex­pressed in the ex­hi­bi­tion’s ti­tle, And ne forhte­don na.

Drawn from the epi­taph of the 20th-cen­tury Ar­gen­tinian writer Jorge Luis Borges, it means “Be not afraid” in Old English.

The phrase is it­self a quote from the An­glo-Saxon poem The Bat­tle of Mal­don, which Borges trans­lated and of­ten dis­cussed.

“Be­cause the ex­hi­bi­tion ti­tle is from Borges’ epi­taph, peo­ple are more likely to feel that this is from the per­spec­tive of death,” says Huang. “On the con­trary, death is part of life too, so this se­ries ex­plores the con­cept of life. Borges has been very ac­tive

He has de­vel­oped his craft through mul­ti­ple se­ries of works

that ex­plore his own emo­tions and ex­pe­ri­ences.

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