Liv­ing

Singapore Tatler Homes - - JUN/JUL ISSUE -

Re­vamp your liv­ing room with dar­ing prints, deep blues and lux­u­ri­ous fin­ishes

It’s time to stop play­ing it safe—this year’s trends em­brace bold prints, deep blues, and earthy ma­te­ri­als such as cork and ter­ra­cotta. In­cor­po­rate them into your liv­ing space in these clever and lux­u­ri­ous ways

1 LOOK: JUN­GA­LOW CHIC

Los An­ge­les-based de­signer and au­thor of best­seller The New Bo­hemi­ans: Cool and Col­lected Homes, Justina Blak­eney’s de­sign stu­dio and blog The Jun­ga­low has spawned a trend of the same name that’s all about dec­o­rat­ing with wild colours, pat­terns and plants. “Jun­ga­low is a fresh take on what we tra­di­tion­ally think of as a bo­hemian life­style,” says Blak­eney. “So many cre­atives work from home these days, and there’s in­creas­ingly less of a dis­tinc­tion be­tween work and play— those blurred lines have al­lowed peo­ple free­dom to use their homes in new and ex­cit­ing ways.” Her sug­ges­tion for the timid is to start with a colour­ful wall­pa­per and a few pot­ted plants. In Sin­ga­pore, Bode car­ries a stun­ning se­lec­tion of jun­ga­low-pat­terned home tex­tiles and fur­ni­ture from brands such as Tim­o­rous Beast­ies, Lib­erty Art Fab­rics and Spring Rhythm. “Jun­ga­low is a meld­ing of sev­eral trends that have been in­creas­ingly pop­u­lar over the past few years. These in­clude tribal, botan­i­cal and kin­folk, which use fab­rics made from nat­u­ral fi­bres such as tex­tured linens and colours dyed us­ing ar­ti­sanal tech­niques—plenty of greens, blues and earth colours,” says Bode’s owner, Jenny Lewis, who thinks that the trend might be a re­ac­tion against the con­trolled and for­mal spa­ces that most city-dwellers live in. “It al­lows one to be more cre­ative when dec­o­rat­ing. The fo­liage, botan­i­cal and for­est mo­tifs of jun­ga­low are ideal for Sin­ga­pore, as they bring the out­doors in.”

“THE FO­LIAGE, BOTAN­I­CAL AND FOR­EST MO­TIFS OF JUN­GA­LOW ARE IDEAL FOR SIN­GA­PORE, AS THEY BRING THE OUT­DOORS IN”

2 MA­TE­RI­ALS: CORK AND TER­RA­COTTA

Sus­tain­abil­ity is a grow­ing pri­or­ity among de­sign­ers and home­own­ers, so it’s no sur­prise that eco-friendly ma­te­ri­als such as ter­ra­cotta and cork are mak­ing their way into liv­ing rooms in new, so­phis­ti­cated ways. Ter­ra­cotta gets a mod­ern makeover by light­ing de­sign­ers such as Pott, which com­bines tra­di­tional pot­tery tech­niques with con­tem­po­rary light­ing ar­range­ments for its pop­u­lar Sponge and Flame pen­dant lamp col­lec­tions. “Peo­ple tend to use ter­ra­cotta in earth-tone decor, but I’ve seen some re­ally im­pres­sive com­bi­na­tions of our ter­ra­cotta lamps with cold colour in­te­ri­ors and in­dus­trial themes,” says Pott’s de­signer, Miguel Án­gel Gar­cia Bel­monte. “When us­ing ter­ra­cotta, don’t be afraid of con­trast—the re­sults can be very in­ter­est­ing.” Por­tuguese cork floor­ing man­u­fac­turer Wi­can­ders’ range of cork floor and wall cov­er­ings are a great al­ter­na­tive to par­quet or tiled floor­ing. “Cork floor­ing re­duces noise from walk­ing by up to 53 per cent com­pared to other ma­te­ri­als,” says the brand’s mar­ket­ing di­rec­tor, Pe­dro Pinho. “Its low con­duc­tiv­ity as­sures op­ti­mal room tem­per­a­ture at any time, trans­lat­ing into en­ergy sav­ings. It pro­vides greater walk­ing com­fort, and thanks to its in­ner flex­i­bil­ity, also re­duces body ten­sion, of­fers su­pe­rior im­pact re­sis­tance, and has a longer life span.” Also in­no­vat­ing with cork is Por­tu­gal­based French de­signer Toni Grilo, whose Cut and Yp­silon col­lec­tions of avant-garde fur­ni­ture de­signed for Por­tuguese brand Black­cork are great con­ver­sa­tion pieces in any liv­ing room. “Cork is a charis­matic and ver­sa­tile ma­te­rial,” says Grilo. “It is en­vi­ron­men­tally friendly, im­proves acous­tic qual­ity, and is avail­able in a mul­ti­tude of fin­ishes and colour vari­a­tions.” She sug­gests us­ing cork in com­bi­na­tion with wood, stone or metal to bring out its nat­u­ral warmth.

“WHEN US­ING TER­RA­COTTA, DON’T BE AFRAID OF CON­TRAST—THE RE­SULTS CAN BE VERY IN­TER­EST­ING”

3 COLOURS: MID­NIGHT AND DUSKY BLUES

The spot­light is now on dusky and mid­night blues, which are calm­ing colours that bal­ance our hec­tic lives. Nor­we­gian paint man­u­fac­turer Jo­tun of­fers the youth­ful Retro blue that, when com­bined with warmer colours such as orange, can re­ally en­er­gise your liv­ing room. There’s also the slightly muted Evening Light, which works well with re­laxed, earthy ma­te­ri­als such as cork and ter­ra­cotta, and the mod­ern and so­phis­ti­cated St Pauls Blue, which is ideal for in­te­ri­ors that in­cor­po­rate fin­ishes such as vel­vet or brass. Jo­tun’s special-ef­fect paints, such as its So­phis­ti­cated Blue, glazed over with Ma­jes­tic De­sign Pearl, can soften the am­bi­ence of your liv­ing room. “Glazed over with the pearles­cent ef­fect, this mys­te­ri­ous dark shade evokes the calm­ing feel of morn­ing mist,” says Kimmy Lim, re­gional colour man­ager of Jo­tun South­east Asia Pa­cific. “It’s great for fea­ture walls, and for adding tex­ture and depth to a room. Psy­cho­log­i­cally, blue is a calm­ing and re­lax­ing colour. It’s also a colour that en­cour­ages pro­duc­tiv­ity.”

4 FIN­ISHES: HINTS OF LUX­URY

This sum­mer, lux­ury whis­pers softly through fin­ishes such as vel­vet, brass, mar­ble, mar­quetry and lac­quer, as seen in UK sofa brand Loaf ’s volup­tuous vel­vet so­fas and arm­chairs, which are avail­able in a va­ri­ety of lively colours. You could also in­tro­duce a touch of lux­ury with com­plex pieces that tell a story. “Some fin­ishes, like mar­quetry, may re­quire sev­eral months to com­plete,” says Mar­i­anne Fabre, co-founder of Sin­ga­pore de­sign stu­dio Akar de Nis­sim. “Nowa­days, peo­ple are more ap­pre­cia­tive of ob­jects with sto­ries be­hind them.” The brand’s Art Deco-in­spired Facet floor lamp and its Iris cof­fee ta­ble are per­fect ex­am­ples of these sorts of pieces. “Use lux­ury fin­ishes spar­ingly,” says Fabre. “Brass ac­cents will give a stronger per­son­al­ity to in­te­ri­ors. A unique slab of rare mar­ble could be the fo­cal point in a liv­ing room. A touch of lux­ury in one place is more ef­fec­tive than us­ing it in large quan­ti­ties in too many ar­eas.”

THIS PAGE Bode’s se­lec­tion of home tex­tiles in­cludes eth­nicin­spired de­tails such pais­ley and ikat from brands in­clud­ing Spring Rhythm and Lib­erty Art Fab­rics OP­PO­SITE PAGE A jun­ga­low­style print from Tim­o­rous Beast­ies, also car­ried by Bode

CLOCK­WISE FROM TOP Pott’s ter­ra­cotta pen­dant lamps; Wi­can­ders has a range of cork floor and wall cov­er­ings; Toni Grilo’s eco-friendly fur­ni­ture which pairs cork with wood and glass

LEFT TO RIGHT A wall clad in the youth­ful Retro blue by Jo­tun; Akar de Nis­sim’s Iris cof­fee ta­ble is made with mar­ble and buf­falo horn mar­quetry, and paired with ei­ther a Tahiti shell or lac­quer fin­ish; Loaf’s vel­vet curved sofa range comes in lively colours

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