FOUR GREAT­NESS SAKE

FERRARI GTC4LUSSO T

Driven - - Driven - Re­port by BERNIE HELLBERG | Images © SCUDERIA SOUTH AFRICA

WHY CHOOSE BE­TWEEN A FERRARI AND A STA­TION WAGON WHEN YOU CAN HAVE A GTC4LUSSO AND GET BOTH? WITH FOUR SEATS, ALL-WHEEL DRIVE, AND A THOR­OUGHLY CA­PA­BLE V8, IT IS THE BEST OF ALL WORLDS, WRITES BERNIE HELLBERG.

It doesn’t mat­ter that the Ferrari GTC4Lusso is quicker around

Ferrari’s Fio­rano test track than its pre­de­ces­sor the FF. This is partly be­cause, es­sen­tially, it is an up­dated ver­sion of the same car. But also be­cause the GTC4Lusso is the lat­est in a long line of four-seat Fer­raris that have, most to a lesser de­gree, moved the bar for what some would ar­gue, should be a dy­ing for­mat for Ferrari.

But it isn’t, and Ferrari has been try­ing hard to pur­pose the ‘fam­ily’ Ferrari for some time.

And with the V8-pow­ered GTC4Lusso T, they come quite close.

WHAT IS IT?

Our GTC4Lusso T test car is the laugh­ingly called en­try model to the GTC4Lusso range. It swaps the en­tranc­ing 507 kW V12 all-wheeldrive ver­sion of its big brother for a 448 kW twin-turbo V8, and light­ens up the driv­e­train by re­duc­ing the driven wheels to the two in the rear.

Ac­cord­ing to the team at Scuderia South Africa, the T will sprint from zero to 100 km/h just 0.1 sec­onds shy of the V12’s time – likely a re­sult of the V8 car­ry­ing less weight in the nose, and with­out the AWD sys­tem. Both mod­els have a seven-speed dual-clutch au­to­matic.

AS FERRARI AS THEY COME

Fer­raris are com­monly ex­pected to be loud, brash de­vices that do ev­ery­thing but mind their own busi­ness. The V8 GTC4Lusso T wants to be dif­fer­ent and tries to muf­fle its Ferrari drama with dou­ble-pane win­dows, a qui­eter ex­haust, and ex­tra sound dead­en­ing for the cabin.

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