HEALTHY LIV­ING

How drink­ing wa­ter (and a touch of al­co­hol) can keep you smarter for longer.

Fairlady - - CONTENTS - BY SUZY BROKENSHA

IT AIN’T ABOUT THE MONEY, HONEY

It turns out that healthy peo­ple are about five to six times as likely to be happy than wealthy peo­ple. Data from the 2010 US Cen­sus shows that those who de­scribed them­selves as healthy are 20% hap­pier than the norm, com­pared to peo­ple in the high­est in­come bracket who are only a pal­try 3.5% hap­pier. (Un­healthy peo­ple came out about 8% less happy than the av­er­age.) Win­ning!

MOV­ING TAR­GET

Us­ing gad­gets that mea­sure how much we move can ac­tu­ally make us eat more, says co-au­thor of The Fast

Diet Dr Michael Mosely, for one of three rea­sons: be­cause we’re so buoyed up by the idea of the calo­ries burned that we want to re­ward our­selves, or be­cause we’ve reached a tar­get and want to re­ward our­selves, or be­cause we’re so de­pressed by not hav­ing reached our tar­get that we want to com­fort our­selves. His sug­ges­tion? Lose the tech and fo­cus on what you eat and how you feel – and, in terms of ex­er­cise, try HIIT (high-in­ten­sity in­ter­val train­ing).

LIQ­UID AS­SETS

Bri­tish neu­ro­sci­en­tist Dr Lisa Mosconi be­lieves that the sin­gle best thing we can do to keep our brains in good nick is to drink eight glasses of wa­ter daily. Wa­ter is in­volved in every chem­i­cal re­ac­tion in your brain, and not drink­ing enough can cause fa­tigue, brain fog, re­duced en­ergy, headaches and mood swings, she told the UK Sun­day Times.

Re­search shows that eight to 10 cups of wa­ter a day can boost your brain’s per­for­mance by al­most 30%! Cof­fee and black tea don’t count – as di­uret­ics, they ac­tu­ally fur­ther de­hy­drate you.

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