FAIRLADY SAN­TAM WOMAN OF THE FU­TURE HOW TO BUILD A WIN­NING TEAM

Here’s what you need to do to put a solid tal­ent man­age­ment strat­egy in place to se­cure the best peo­ple for your busi­ness.

Fairlady - - BIZ SAVVY - By An­nette La Grange

ith the fourth in­dus­trial rev­o­lu­tion loom­ing, now’s the time to re­flect on what makes a win­ning team – and how to build one. Tal­ent man­age­ment strate­gies are vi­tal to en­sure a steady suc­ces­sion of smart, ca­pa­ble staff. More­over, hav­ing the best peo­ple is im­por­tant for busi­ness growth. But how does a busi­ness also cre­ate a cul­ture that top per­form­ers want to be part of?

It starts at the top: the more open, hon­est and eth­i­cal a leader is, the more th­ese val­ues will fil­ter through the busi­ness. As a busi­ness owner, it’s im­per­a­tive that you know what you want to achieve and what you stand for so you can pro­vide a clear vi­sion for your team. Here are a few build­ing blocks to put a good tal­ent man­age­ment strat­egy in place:

THE ROLE YOU’RE FILL­ING MUST IN­FORM THE TRAITS YOU WANT

Know what you want to achieve and what kind of skills you need to get there. Then you’ll know which non­nego­tiable skills and ex­pe­ri­ence you need when hir­ing. Be wary of un­con­scious bi­ases (hir­ing peo­ple sim­i­lar to you, for ex­am­ple) and putting peo­ple into boxes – peo­ple are more com­plex than a CV could ever show. Some skills can be learned, but at­ti­tudes are usu­ally en­trenched, so choose peo­ple with good at­ti­tudes who will add value to the team dy­namic.

FIND SOME­ONE WHO IS THE RIGHT FIT FOR YOUR BUSI­NESS CUL­TURE

• An in­ter­view is a two-way con­ver­sa­tion: you’re as­sess­ing a can­di­date, and they’re as­sess­ing you and the com­pany. Lis­ten for ques­tions from the ap­pli­cant that go be­yond generic in­ter­view ques­tions; th­ese will give you a good sense of whether they seem to be the right fit. • Probe an­swers with fol­low-up ques­tions that go deeper into how the per­son thinks: for ex­am­ple, ‘What would you change if this were your busi­ness?’ • Be on the look­out for val­ues that are im­por­tant to your busi­ness. A per­son who bad-mouths a pre­vi­ous em­ployer, for ex­am­ple, may not be re­spect­ful. • Ask how the in­di­vid­ual works in a team dy­namic and whether they have a proven track record of de­liv­er­ing as part of a col­lab­o­ra­tive ef­fort. • In­clude some of your em­ploy­ees in the in­ter­view to get other per­spec­tives on the can­di­date.

AT­TRACT TOP TAL­ENT

Think about what your ideal em­ployee would value: flexi hours, con­tin­u­ous learn­ing op­por­tu­ni­ties, fair ma­ter­nity and pa­ter­nity leave? Di­ver­sity is im­por­tant to en­sure that you don’t build your brand on the needs of a spe­cific group that could change quickly. Em­brace flex­i­bil­ity and stay close to your em­ploy­ees to un­der­stand what they value in terms of com­pany cul­ture.

THE RECIPE FOR A WIN­NING TEAM

Choose peo­ple who will pro­vide ex­per­tise in ar­eas that you’re less com­pe­tent in. Fo­cus on di­ver­sity: var­i­ous per­spec­tives in­crease prof­itabil­ity. You need peo­ple who think dif­fer­ently from one an­other – and from you – to spark in­ge­nu­ity. Lead­er­ship is cru­cial: make sure ev­ery­one is clear on the com­pany goals and their re­spon­si­bil­i­ties, and that there are op­por­tu­ni­ties for growth for ev­ery mem­ber of staff.

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