An Eye on the Truth

Spec-Savers

Indwe - - Contents - Text & Im­age © Spec-Savers

FALSE: READ­ING IN DIM LIGHT IS BAD FOR YOUR EYES

For cen­turies, be­fore the in­ven­tion of elec­tric­ity, peo­ple worked in very poor light con­di­tions, but while this may have fa­tigued their eyes, it didn’t nec­es­sar­ily dam­age them. To avoid eye fa­tigue, be sure to read in am­ple light, though.

FALSE: EAT­ING CAR­ROTS WILL GIVE YOU PER­FECT VI­SION

Car­rots con­tain Vi­ta­min A, which is good for your eye health, but other foods also con­tain Vi­ta­min A, so eat­ing specif­i­cally car­rots has no di­rect im­pact on the over­all health of your eyes.

FALSE: SIT­TING CLOSE TO THE TV WILL DAM­AGE CHIL­DREN’S EYES

Chil­dren are able to fo­cus at close dis­tances with­out caus­ing any strain to their eyes. Chil­dren who are near-sighted (my­opia) also some­times have to sit closer to the tele­vi­sion in or­der to see. Again, this may cause eye fa­tigue, but won’t dam­age their eyes.

FALSE: STAR­ING AT COM­PUTER SCREENS CAN DAM­AGE YOUR EYES

Dis­com­fort – rather than dam­age – can be caused by star­ing at a com­puter screen for too long, as you blink less, which causes “dry eyes”. To avoid this, try to take reg­u­lar breaks to give your eyes a rest. Look­ing at ob­jects fur­ther away of­ten re­lieves the feel­ing of strain on your eyes. FALSE: YOU SHOULD AVOID READ­ING FINE PRINT IF YOU HAVE WEAK EYES Though your eye­sight may de­te­ri­o­rate as you age, you can’t “wear out” your eyes by read­ing small text.

REC­OM­MEN­DA­TIONS TO HEED IN­STEAD

Main­tain­ing good eye­sight in­cludes wear­ing sun­glasses in harsh light, turn­ing on the blue light fil­ter on your smart­phone, en­sur­ing your com­puter mon­i­tor is slightly low­ered so you look down at your screen, eat­ing a bal­anced diet, and tak­ing vi­ta­min sup­ple­ments.

It is best to have reg­u­lar check-ups with a pro­fes­sional op­tometrist for a thor­ough and ac­cu­rate eye test. If you are ex­pe­ri­enc­ing per­sis­tent dis­com­fort, get a head start on deal­ing with any de­vel­op­ing con­di­tions by sched­ul­ing an ap­point­ment with your near­est Spec­Savers op­tometrist.

At Spec-Savers – thanks to years of ex­pe­ri­ence and in-depth knowl­edge – they will give you the facts, and not the myths.

Visit spec­savers.co.za to book your ap­point­ment to­day.

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