South­ern Africa’s Great Cap­i­tal Cities

SOUTH­ERN AFRICA’S GREAT CAP­I­TAL CITIES

Indwe - - Contents - Text: Phindiwe Nkosi Im­ages © iS­tock­photo.com

If you’re trav­el­ling in Africa and your time is lim­ited, here is what you have to see when you find your­self in one of these five South­ern African cap­i­tal cities. We take a closer look at the best that the cap­i­tal cities of Gaborone, Windhoek, Lusaka, Ma­puto and Harare have to of­fer.

Gaborone, Botswana

Although Gaborone is a bustling, mod­ern me­trop­o­lis, there are many rea­sons why the Gaborone Game Re­serve is one of the most pop­u­lar tourist at­trac­tions in the area. Known for its pic­nic ar­eas, visi­tor cen­tres, and the abun­dance of wildlife within its bor­ders, the re­serve is also home to a wide va­ri­ety of bird species.

Gaborone is also ideal for meet­ing roy­alty. The Three Dik­gosi Mon­u­ment is a bronze sculp­ture that cel­e­brates the coun­try’s rich royal her­itage. The peo­ple of Botswana are not afraid to cel­e­brate their own, and this mon­u­ment, erected to in­form both cur­rent and fu­ture gen­er­a­tions about their tra­di­tional lead­ers, is a shin­ing ex­am­ple of the peo­ple of Botswana’s na­tional pride.

Mean­ing “kings”, the Dik­gosi stat­ues show­case three kings: Khama III of the Bang­wato, Se­bele I of the Bak­wena, and Bathoen I of the Bang­waketse. They stand as proud sym­bols of the rich tra­di­tional cul­ture of this mighty na­tion. It is com­mon for events to be held at the mon­u­ment – and what bet­ter lo­ca­tion to add grav­i­tas than one that is as­so­ci­ated with roy­alty?

For an in­tri­cate un­der­stand­ing and rep­re­sen­ta­tion of this na­tion’s cul­tural arte­facts, Botswana Crafts is your go-to des­ti­na­tion. It is one of the largest crafts cen­tres in Gaborone. Here, you can learn about tra­di­tional beads, and find out about how and why some tra­di­tional crafts are made. The mar­ket is a one-stop des­ti­na­tion for lo­cally in­spired African sou­venirs.

While at the mar­ket, be sure to visit The Court­yard Restau­rant for de­li­cious tra­di­tional food and de­lec­ta­ble desserts. The restau­rant of­fers a sen­sory ex­pe­ri­ence of Botswana’s cul­tur­ally sig­nif­i­cant dishes.

Windhoek, Namibia

True to the spirit of Africa, to un­der­stand a place and its essence, you need first to un­cover its past. While the past is by no means an in­di­ca­tion of one’s des­tiny, it is in­tri­cately in­ter­wo­ven into the be­liefs and ide­olo­gies of many who call Namibia home.

In­au­gu­rated in 2002 by for­mer state pres­i­dent Sam Nu­joma, the He­roes’ Acre – a me­mo­rial for Namib­ian war he­roes – com­mem­o­rates Namibia’s in­de­pen­dence. Here one can drift away from the hus­tle­and-bus­tle of ev­ery­day city life, draw­ing nearer to na­ture in a space that com­mands your at­ten­tion.

The He­roes’ Acre is home to both oc­cu­pied and un­oc­cu­pied tombs. Some of those com­mem­o­rated in this sanc­tu­ary are not buried here, but their spir­its are recog­nised in this grand place that is ab­so­lutely worth see­ing when vis­it­ing Windhoek.

Lusaka, Zam­bia

In Zam­bia, noth­ing is ever named coin­ci­den­tally, as Zam­bians be­lieve that there should al­ways be more to a name than merely the way it sounds. It is said

Windhoek, Namibia

Windhoek, Namibia

Gaborone, Botswana

Lusaka, Zam­bia

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.