Short cut

True Love Hair - - CONTENTS - By MBALI SOGA

Many celebs are trad­ing their sig­na­ture long tresses for a fuss-free hair­cut. We look at what makes the style so trendy and how you can make chop­ping your hair work for you.

Fol­low­ing Lupita Ny­ong’o’s short hair­dos on the red car­pet, and singer and media per­son­al­ity Nandi Ma­dida’s break­out street-style fades, short cuts are trend­ing. A bevy of stars, in­clud­ing ac­tresses Taraji P. Hen­son, Sanaa Lathan, Tisha Camp­bell-Martin and Linda Mtoba, and rap­per Gigi La­mayne, have fol­lowed suit. The trend proves that women don’t need long hair to look gor­geous. If you’re due for a hair­style change, short could be the way to go.

CHOOS­ING THE RIGHT CUT

Long, thick hair: The longer and fuller your hair, the more op­tions you’ll have when it comes to the sym­me­try and height of the cut. Go vo­lu­mi­nous at the crown and slowly fade to a brush cut at the nape of the neck.

Thin hair: The shorter, the bet­ter. The less hair you have, the harder it’ll be for peo­ple to see how lit­tle hair you have. Af­ter all, it’s best to work with what you have. Round head: Go for styles that give your head shape – boxy and flat on the crown, and sleek and straight on the sides is per­fect. It will give the il­lu­sion of height and give you cheek­bones.

Pro­nounced fore­head: If, like many women, you have a big fore­head, avoid­ing short hair is not the only so­lu­tion. This is when length and hair pieces come in handy as they fall gen­tly on your fore­head, mak­ing it less pro­nounced.

ACE THE AF­TER-CARE ROU­TINE

Most peo­ple think that hav­ing short hair means no af­ter­care, and that a sim­ple in-and-out-of-the-shower rou­tine will suf­fice. Not true! Short hair needs as much TLC as longer hair, es­pe­cially when it comes to look­ing af­ter your scalp, which is more ex­posed to risks like sun­burn or dry­ness be­cause it has less pro­tec­tion.

Wash­ing: Most peo­ple think that you can use or­di­nary sham­poo on short hair, or even worse, use the same soap you ap­ply on your face. Do­ing so will dry out your scalp, caus­ing un­sightly flakes and a brittle tex­ture. In­vest in a con­di­tion­ing sham­poo that cleanses and for­ti­fies your hair. If you pre­fer to wash hair ev­ery day, find a gen­tle for­mula. We rec­om­mend wash­ing your hair once a week. Dry­ing: Re­frain from rub­bing your hair af­ter wash­ing as it may break eas­ily. In­stead, pat hair dry and if you’re in a hurry, dry it with a dif­fuser. Dry­ing your hair nat­u­rally is the best op­tion as heat takes away mois­ture.

In­vest in a hair oil: Rub a hair oil into the scalp and hair twice a week, or af­ter your weekly wash. It’s a lightweight yet ef­fi­cient way to add much-needed nu­tri­ents to your hair, and it gives your tresses nat­u­ral sheen with­out mak­ing them sticky. Look out for nat­u­ral in­gre­di­ents such as co­conut oil, amla oil and jo­joba oil to make your hair softer and eas­ier to man­age.

TARAJI P HEN­SON

TEX­TURED CROWN FOR HEIGHT

AMANDLA STEN­BERG STRAIGHTEN FOR VER­SA­TIL­ITY

HULISANI RAVELE

BUZZ CUT WITH COOL LINES

TISHA CAMP­BELL-MARTIN ADD A CURLY EX­TEN­SION

Afro Botan­ics African Oil Blend R94,95

Philips Se­ries 500 Hair Clip­per R779,90

LOOT LOVE ASYMMETRICAL HEIGHTS

Easy Waves Co­conut Hair Food R22,95

Mera Amla Oil Sham­poo R79,95

GOAPELE PER­FECT THE FADE

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