SHORT­CUTS

Weekend Argus (Saturday Edition) - - GOODMOVIES -

NEW RE­LEASES

The Hunger Games: Mock­ing­jay – Part 2: The four-film saga of Kat­niss Everdeen (Jen­nifer Lawrence)comes to a con­clu­sion in this fi­nale to the dystopian sci-fi ac­tion se­ries about a rebel up­ris­ing against an au­to­cratic regime struc­tured around glad­i­a­to­rial spec­ta­cle. ★★★★ He Named Me Malala: Davis Guggen­heim’s documentary paints a por­trait of Malala Yousafzai, the 18year-old ac­tivist and No­bel Peace Prize win­ner, whose coura­geous ad­vo­cacy for girls’ ed­u­ca­tion has res­onated through the world. ★★★★ Mag­gie: This un­usual zom­bie drama star­ring Arnold Sch­warzeneg­ger as Wade, a tac­i­turn farmer, is not your typ­i­cal Hol­ly­wood block­buster. Wade’s teenage daugh­ter Mag­gie (Abi­gail Bres­lin), has been bit­ten, but so far shows no symp­toms of trans­form­ing into a zom­bie – but she will. Much of the film deals with Wade wrestling with his de­ci­sion about what to do with her. The film suf­fers a bit for its slow­ness. But once you get used to the fact that this is not World War Z, it has its small plea­sures – both cere­bral and emo­tional. ★★★ No Es­cape: In their new (un­named, in the film) over­seas home, an Amer­i­can fam­ily find them­selves caught in the mid­dle of a coup, and they fran­ti­cally look for an es­cape as for­eign­ers are be­ing ex­e­cuted. In this sus­pense­ful but bor­der­line racist thriller, ev­ery Asian char­ac­ter is ei­ther a ruth­less mur­derer or anony­mous col­lat­eral dam­age. A lot of lo­cals have to die, the film sug­gests, in or­der for one white fam­ily to sur­vive. ★★★ ’n Man Soos My Pa: This drama ex­plores fa­mil­ial dev­as­ta­tion and the wide rip­pling ef­fects of ad­dic­tion. News of a ter­mi­nal ill­ness draws one fam­ily to­gether for the first time in sev­eral years. Deal­ing with im­mi­nent death, a fa­ther, mother and son must find the courage to for­give the ter­ri­ble mis­takes of the past. ★★★

ON CIR­CUIT

Grandma: Elle Reid, a tart-tongued sep­tu­a­ge­nar­ian au­thor who charges through life like a bull in a china shop, is the sort of char­ac­ter Lily Tom­lin might have cre­ated decades ago. But it’s doubt­ful the 75-year-old Tom­lin could have played Elle then with the same deep re­serves of anger and sor­row she brings to Grandma, an

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