AVOID ALL HORMONAL CON­TRA­CEP­TIVES, IN­CLUD­ING PRO­GES­TERONE-ONLY PROD­UCTS, IF:

Your Baby & Toddler - - Baby Files -

Your baby is pre­ma­ture and/or ill; Your baby is younger than six weeks; You gave birth to mul­ti­ples; You have had breast surgery; Your milk sup­ply was low with pre­vi­ous chil­dren. DI­AG­NOSED WITH GESTATIONAL DI­A­BETES DUR­ING PREG­NANCY? The mini-pill might in­crease your risk of de­vel­op­ing type 2 di­a­betes. Be sure to dis­cuss your con­tra­cep­tive op­tions with your health­care provider.

LAST CHOICE: OE­STRO­GEN-BASED CON­TRA­CEP­TIVES

When it comes to com­bined con­tra­cep­tives – those con­tain­ing oe­stro­gen in ad­di­tion to pro­ges­terone – the po­ten­tial risks usu­ally out­weigh the ben­e­fits. Oe­stro­gen can have a dev­as­tat­ing ef­fect on milk sup­ply, es­pe­cially when taken in high dosages and/ or shortly af­ter birth. Stud­ies dat­ing back to the 1980s demon­strate that the com­bi­na­tion pill can de­crease breast­milk pro­duc­tion by 20% to 40%. Al­though newer con­tra­cep­tives con­tain lower doses, lac­ta­tion ex­perts rec­om­mend avoid­ing oe­stro­gen com­pletely for at least six months, and prefer­ably for the du­ra­tion of breast­feed­ing.

EMER­GENCY CON­TRA­CEP­TION

Can you take the morn­ing-af­ter pill? Yes. Should you pump and dump af­ter­wards? No need. De­spite the high dosage, hor­mone lev­els in the breast­milk will re­main ac­cept­able. Your milk sup­ply may drop tem­po­rar­ily, but fre­quent feed­ing will re­store it soon enough. Once again, a pro­ges­terone-only prod­uct is best.

IS SUR­GI­CAL STER­IL­I­SA­TION POS­SI­BLE?

Post-op­er­a­tive pain might make nurs­ing un­com­fort­able, but oth­er­wise the pro­ce­dure has no im­pact on breast­feed­ing.

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