case in point

Emirates Woman - - Beauty/fragrance - Word s : Sophia Serin

BOND GIRL AND ALL­ROUND STYLE ICON LEA SEDOUX TALKS SCENTS WITH JAC­QUES CAVALLIER BELLETRUD, THE IM­PRES­SIVE CRE­ATOR OF THE FRA­GRANCES BE­HIND FAMED FRENCH FASH­ION HOUSE LOUIS VUIT­TON

Rose des Vents is the first fra­grance in the col­lec­tion Les Par­fums Louis Vuit­ton. To what ex­tent does the May rose from Grasse play a sig­nif­i­cant part? Jac­ques Cavallier Belletrud: The May rose

from Grasse is the most ex­quis­ite rose that ex­ists in the world. To me, it rep­re­sents the com­plex­ity of fem­i­nin­ity. Léa Sey­doux: For me, it’s the volup­tuous side. I love this fra­grance, par­tic­u­larly the flo­ral notes and the strong, dom­i­nant rose. I think the rose is the sym­bol of fem­i­nin­ity. It em­bod­ies mys­tery and sen­su­al­ity. I re­ally like this feel­ing.

Sim­i­lar to the use of the May rose from Grasse in Rose des Vents, was us­ing jas­mine from Grasse an ob­vi­ous choice? JCB:

I had wanted to pay trib­ute to tuberose in a per­fume for a long time. For Tur­bu­lences, I as­so­ci­ated tuberose with jas­mine gran­di­flo­rum from Grasse. This fra­grance rep­re­sents the mem­ory of a meeting be­tween tuberose and jas­mine in my gar­den. For me, it is the fu­sion of both scents that makes this per­fume un­for­get­table. LS: Com­bin­ing tuberose and jas­mine is just like a clash of two cul­tures [or] like [the con­trast be­tween] white and black. Jac­ques en­joys mix­ing scents that are very dif­fer­ent.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UAE

© PressReader. All rights reserved.