MAR­CUS HOWARTH

MAR­CUS HOWARTH RE­VEALS HIS TOP TIPS TO HELP YOU TO PUT A GI­ANT ON THE BANK THIS AU­TUMN…

Angling Times (UK) - - CONTENTS -

#1 PICK THE RIGHT VE NUE

If you are chas­ing a new PB you need to pick a venue that has a few fish of a sim­i­lar size in it. If you want to catch your first thirty, pick a venue with a few fish over that bar­rier, not just the one. Lakes such as Lin­ear Fish­eries, open to all, have a huge stock of big carp.

It’s no use fish­ing for a fish of 35lb if the venue that you are tar­get­ing doesn’t have one. Ei­ther fish a place that you have been tar­get­ing all sea­son, or have a go on one of the many day-ticket wa­ters avail­able.

#2 LEAD AROUND

I spend as long as I need to, try­ing to find out what is on the bot­tom. I like to fish in the cleaner, silty ar­eas in the au­tumn and that is what I will try to find with a bare lead on some braid. Those slightly deeper, softer ar­eas that are still free of weed are perfect spots to present a bait on.

On the busier and more pres­sured lakes, cast­ing the rod any­where won’t be enough to catch one. You have to try to find some­where that the carp are happy to eat from.

#3 BANK ON BOILIES!

I use them all year, but in the au­tumn boilies come into their own. Carp love them, es­pe­cially big carp, and I base all my bait­ing around them. Carp need to build up the fats and nu­tri­ents to see them through the win­ter.

They can go on a real munch at this time of year, which is why it is of­ten the most fruit­ful of the sea­sons. With boilies, they can get a heap of the nu­tri­tion they need, just from a few mouth­fuls.

I per­son­ally pre­fer a fish­meal, with The Krill be­ing my favourite bait of all time. The fish are not bounc­ing around the lake as much as they would do in the sum­mer and are not look­ing for those high-en­ergy, car­bo­hy­drate baits. They want their pro­tein.

#4 USE HE­LI­COPTER RIGS

Due to the na­ture of the spots that I like to fish (de­scribed above), I find my­self us­ing a he­li­copter rig most of the time. It is a lead ar­range­ment for fish­ing on softer bot­toms. It also sits proud of any silty or de­bris, al­low­ing your hook­link to sit nicely over the top of what­ever it may be.

A lead clip is great for fish­ing over the firmer spots, but with all the fall­ing leaves en­ter­ing the lake, and dy­ing weed, the he­li­copter is my pre­ferred choice for this time of year.

#5 PUT FAITH IN POP-UP RIGS

This is not al­ways the case for the au­tumn, but for this one in par­tic­u­lar I will be us­ing pop-ups a lot. Since stum­bling across a rig called the ‘Ron­nie Rig’, I have such con­fi­dence in pop-up fish­ing that I am strug­gling to use any­thing else. It sits per­fectly, ly­ing low to the bot­tom, and has a lot of move­ment. For fish­ing in the silt it is perfect, and I’ve al­ready caught a num­ber of lovely carp us­ing it.

#6 PIN IT DOWN

The carp are very cau­tious this time of year. They have most likely been caught a few times al­ready and they will have their guard up. One of the eas­i­est things that they will spook off is lines. I think it is more on feel than sight, and should they de­tect dan­ger when they are

“CARP HAVE MOST LIKELY BEEN CAUGHT A FEW TIMES AND WILL HAVE THEIR GUARD UP”

feed­ing, those fish will be off. I al­ways make a point of mould­ing putty on my hook­links, with a cou­ple of blobs up the main­line too, just to make sure ev­ery­thing is pinned down.

#7 GLUG ’EM UP

I am a huge fan of glug­ging my free­bies and hook­baits. I want those fishy aminos that carp can de­tect all around the hook­bait.

I glug my pop-ups in L-Zero 30T and a lit­tle bit of the Pure Krill liq­uid too. It gives the bait a light, con­gealed coating of liq­uid and I am to­tally con­vinced that it gets me more bites.

#8 LONG HOOK­LINKS

It seems the ‘in’ thing to be us­ing a short, stiff hook­link. Carp learn by as­so­ci­a­tion, and if that is what they see day in, day out, they will learn to deal with it. I pre­fer us­ing a longer hook­link, mainly to be dif­fer­ent, but I also think it helps me catch more fish.

Big carp, es­pe­cially, can feed a lit­tle way off the bot­tom. A short, stiff hook­link would not be suited to this sit­u­a­tion, so this is why I use a longer one. It will work for fish of all sizes and I be­lieve it can be a real edge on pres­sured lakes.

#9 SEMI-SLACK LINES

For the same rea­son that I use putty, I slacken my lines off – to get them down and away from the feed­ing fish. I find that with a slack line, if a fish comes into con­tact with it, it could feel as if it has brushed it­self on some weed and there is no dan­ger.

If it comes into con­tact with a bow­string­taut line, it will know some­thing is up.

Com­bin­ing a semi-slack line with a light bob­bin will en­able you to de­tect line bites a lot eas­ier and you will know when fish are feed­ing in the swim.

My fi­nal tip is the most im­por­tant – what­ever else you do, en­joy your carp fish­ing!

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