YOUNG PEO­PLE DE­SERVE BET­TER

BBC Music Magazine - - LETTERS - Tony King, New­cas­tle upon Tyne

Richard Mor­ri­son is right that for clas­si­cal mu­sic to sur­vive, we need to shout about its ben­e­fits (September). As an am­a­teur mu­si­cian, I know that my life is en­riched by mu­sic. As a sci­ence teacher, I know the dam­age that down­grad­ing mu­sic and arts in schools in Eng­land as a di­rect re­sult of the English Bac­calau­re­ate (Ebacc) will do to the young peo­ple I teach. There is clear ev­i­dence that high-qual­ity mu­si­cal tu­ition has ben­e­fits to nu­mer­acy, lit­er­acy, self-con­fi­dence, re­silience, mo­tor skills, em­pa­thy, in­for­ma­tion pro­cess­ing and at­ten­tion span.

These are ben­e­fits I want for the pupils in my sci­ence class, be­cause I know they will help them be­come bet­ter sci­en­tists; these are ben­e­fits I want for every child re­gard­less of their am­bi­tions or home cir­cum­stances, be­cause I know they will have hap­pier, more ful­filled lives. The Ebacc is an ill-con­ceived and un­wel­come re­form that will do a great deal of harm to mu­sic and to much, much more.

Every month the edi­tor will award a So­lardab 2 Roberts ra­dio (re­tail value £80 – see www.robert­sra­dio.co.uk) to the writer of the best let­ter re­ceived. The edi­tor re­serves the right to shorten let­ters for pub­li­ca­tion.

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