Pres­sure cooker could have killed me

NI woman’s ter­ror as ap­pli­ance ex­plodes

Belfast Telegraph - - FRONT PAGE - BY BRETT CAMPBELL

A CO Down woman told last night of her ter­ror at be­ing “al­most blinded or worse” af­ter a pres­sure cooker ex­ploded in her face.

Rumer Priestly (25) had been mak­ing soup and de­cided to use the ap­pli­ance for the first time, but ended up in A&E af­ter things went ter­ri­fy­ingly wrong. “It felt like some­one had thrown acid in my face. I was cry­ing be­cause of the ex­treme pain but the hot tears only made it worse,” the Greyabbey woman said.

“I don’t have a clear mem­ory of what hap­pened but I ended up on the other side of the kitchen, cov­ered in boil­ing hot soup.”

Her mother Pamela heard a “big bang” from the liv­ing room, and was left speech­less when she saw the af­ter­math.

Rumer has spo­ken out to warn others against us­ing a pres­sure cooker with­out do­ing some re­search into them.

A YOUNG woman has told how she was “al­most blinded or even worse” when a pres­sure cooker ex­ploded in her face.

Rumer Priestly was mak­ing soup on Wed­nes­day night and de­cided to use the ap­pli­ance for the first time, but she ended up in A&E af­ter things went ter­ri­fy­ingly wrong.

The 25-year-old from Greyabbey in Co Down said she was left in agony af­ter be­ing cov­ered in boil­ing liq­uid.

“It felt like some­one had thrown acid in my face. I was cry­ing be­cause of the ex­treme pain but the hot tears only made it worse,” she told the Belfast Tele­graph.

“I don’t have a clear mem­ory of what hap­pened but I ended up on the other side of the kitchen cov­ered in boil­ing hot soup. It was in my hair, on my face and all over my clothes — it was even up the walls and on the ceil­ing.”

She had used a wooden spoon to slide the vent open to re­lease some steam, which caused the ex­plo­sion, but she be­lieves her cloth­ing and glasses spared her from worse in­juries.

“I thought if I let a bit of steam es­cape I could take the lid off to add more in­gre­di­ents, but the lid just blew off the top of it,” she ex­plained. “If I hadn’t been wear­ing my glasses at the time I have no doubt I would have lost my vi­sion.

“I was also wear­ing a long sleeved T-shirt, which stopped my arms from be­ing scalded. It could have been so much worse.”

De­spite be­ing in a state of shock she man­aged to re­act quickly by re­mov­ing her T-shirt and splash­ing her face with wa­ter be­fore her dis­traught mum rushed her to hos­pi­tal.

“I ap­plied an ice-pack and took it with me in the car be­cause my chest and face was burn­ing,” she said.

“I’m not sure if that was the right thing to do but it was the only thing that stopped the pain. I’m still very ten­der un­der my eyes and across my fore­head, but com­pared to how I was I’m much bet­ter.”

Her mother Pamela had been in the liv­ing room when she heard a “big bang”. She ini­tially thought her daugh­ter had fallen, but she was left speech­less when she got up to in­ves­ti­gate and wit­nessed the af­ter­math. “Rumer was stripped off at the far end of the kitchen and there was boil­ing liq­uid ev­ery­where, I couldn’t be­lieve it — it was re­ally scary,” she said. “It just goes to show the power of the pres­sure.

“We were both fright­ened and she just looked scalded, it was a nightmare.” She be­lieves that her daugh­ter’s cloth­ing spared her from ex­cru­ci­at­ing burns. “We found her glasses sit­ting be­side the cooker and they were cov­ered in thick soup which had hard­ened. It was on the in­side and out­side of the lenses,” she added.

“Even with the glasses it man­aged to burn her eye­lids, and I have no doubt that if it wasn’t for her glasses and choice of T-shirt she would have been se­verely burned.”

Af­ter be­ing treated at the Ul­ster Hos­pi­tal, Rumer is now at home re­cov­er­ing af­ter her or­deal and wants to warn others against us­ing a pres­sure cooker with­out do­ing some home­work.

“In fair­ness I am not well versed in us­ing pres­sure cook­ers, so I know it wasn’t the best idea,” she said. “This was my er­ror, but it’s not some­thing you think you need a les­son for — you don’t need to learn how to use a saucepan.

“I had no idea how dan­ger­ous they can be. If you have never used one be­fore then don’t do so with­out first learn­ing how they work. I have been lucky, but it was a nar­row es­cape.”

Rumer Priestly’s face and chest were burned in the freak ac­ci­dent. She be­lieves her glasses saved her from suf­fer­ing greater in­jury

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