Ways to make more of your GAR­DEN BIRD­WATCH­ING

Fol­low this se­ries of top tips to get the most from your gar­den and the birds that visit it

Bird Watching (UK) - - Garden Birds -

WORDS: MATT MER­RITT & REBECCA HAMMETT

et­ting to know your gar­den birds is the first step that many of us take on the road to get­ting to know birds more gen­er­ally. They’re right out­side the back door, so watch­ing them doesn’t re­quire any more than a pair of binoc­u­lars and a few mo­ments fit­ted into the daily rou­tine. But gar­den bird­watch­ing doesn’t have to be about the same old species, or seen as a poor re­la­tion of more gen­eral bird­ing. In the next 24 pages, we’ll give you ideas on how and what to feed birds and what to do to pro­vide them with homes. Plus, we’ll look at some of the prod­ucts that can help you do this and we also fea­ture 36 of the com­mon­est gar­den species. It might sound ob­vi­ous, and it’s cer­tainly the most im­por­tant way in which you can help your gar­den birds, but feed­ing them not only has the pleas­ant pay-off, for you, of get­ting to see them at close quar­ters, but it could also make the dif­fer­ence be­tween life and death for them. Re­mem­ber though, once you have started putting food out, birds may come to rely on your help, and that they need feed­ing in the breed­ing sea­son and sum­mer ev­ery bit as much as in the colder months. If adult birds can grab food from the feed­ers and ta­bles quickly, eas­ily and safely, then they can de­vote for­ag­ing time to pro­vid­ing for young­sters. Don’t take our word for it – young birder Rebecca Hammett has com­piled her own guide (see end of this ar­ti­cle) to feed­ing gar­den birds, and it works! Rebecca even tells you how to make how to make your own pine cone feed­ers!

A Wood­pi­geon vists a newly­stocked bird ta­ble

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