RAR­ITY PRE­DIC­TOR

Bird Watching (UK) - - Your Birding Month -

Here we go again with an­other ed­u­cated stab in the dark, try­ing to pre­dict an ex­treme rar­ity for March, based on for­mer records of birds which have oc­curred in the coun­try.

ROCK THRUSH

There have been fewer than 30 ac­cepted records of this moun­tain lov­ing, red-tailed thrush, only three of which have been in this mil­len­nium. Though April is prob­a­bly a bet­ter bet for one turn­ing up, one in March would not be un­prece­dented.

LESSER KESTREL

The Mins­mere, Suf­folk, male of 2010 was present for four days in late March, so an early spring record is pos­si­ble for this very rare Euro­pean fal­con. Per­haps this March?

AMER­I­CAN ROBIN

Ev­ery year var­i­ous pre­sumed au­tumn ar­rivals ap­pear as if by magic, of­ten in a gar­den or a park. Could an Amer­i­can Robin be lurk­ing out there some­where, ready to re­veal it­self this month?

HOW DID WE DO? PA­CIFIC DIVER

Once again, this month we need to give our­selves a pat on the back for our pre­dic­tion of Pa­cific Diver for the Jan­uary is­sue. Not only did the Cor­nish bird re­turn for its 11th win­ter pe­riod, but a new bird was also found, this time in Northum­ber­land. Ex­cep­tion­ally showy and so very well re­ceived by pho­tog­ra­phers, this diver turned up at the Blyth Es­tu­ary and re­lo­cated to Druridge Bay where it could pro­vide lit­er­ally frame-fill­ing shots.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.