199A – The Blue Bul­taco

Classic Trial - - COMPARISON -

The model 199A is bet­ter known as the ‘Blue Bul­taco’. This has a host of mod­i­fi­ca­tions that have been in­spired from the Aldo Bul­taco (see Clas­sic Trial Magazine is­sue 18) this model is a 325cc. The ma­chine is the re­sult of lots of lit­tle mod­i­fi­ca­tions made to adapt the ma­chine to mod­ern rid­ing tech­niques.

On the frame they have as usual low­ered and moved back­ward the footrest po­si­tion, and the footrests them­selves are mod­ern ones. The rear shock ab­sorbers are ‘Mag­i­cals’ and they have once again also used a fork yoke from a mod­ern ma­chine to help when rid­ing the more mod­ern haz­ards of to­day’s events. The front fork springs have been re­placed with a pair of ‘Mag­i­cal’ units which give a more rigid feel, help­ing to limit the com­pres­sion of the front forks on down­hill turns giv­ing the rider more con­fi­dence. A tube­less rear wheel rim al­lows the cor­rect mounting of a Miche­lin X11 tube­less tyre.

To make the feel from the back brake more ef­fi­cient a steel rod is fit­ted in­stead of the orig­i­nal cable sys­tem, which makes the rear brak­ing more ef­fec­tive. The front brake is not a Bul­taco orig­i­nal unit be­cause the chromed brak­ing path lost part of the chrome, mak­ing the power of the brake very poor. This is a typ­i­cal prob­lem of the orig­i­nal model 199’s front brake. The so­lu­tion for this prob­lem, car­ried out by Ric­cardo, is to mount a Grimeca front wheel com­ing from an SWM; how­ever the brake plate is lo­cated on the op­po­site side com­pared with the orig­i­nal Bul­taco one. This makes a bet­ter route for the front brake cable, and the steel brake con­tact path be­tween the brake show ma­te­rial and the con­tact path on the brak­ing area are so much bet­ter than the orig­i­nal unit. Much work has been car­ried out on the clutch sys­tem, with mod­i­fi­ca­tions car­ried out on the push rod and the clutch ro­tors/plates. The parts are from a Fan­tic, with the ob­jec­tive be­ing to have a light ac­tion on the lever and good per­for­mance in terms of ef­fec­tive­ness. Com­pared with the orig­i­nal com­po­nents this is a real im­prove­ment. A Mikuni car­bu­ret­tor makes the char­ac­ter­is­tics of the power de­liv­ery softer com­pared with the orig­i­nal Bing car­bu­ret­tor fit­ted. It is also eas­ier to source Mikuni parts in or­der to set up the car­bu­re­tion to your own per­sonal re­quire­ments.

On this ma­chine we have a big air fil­ter com­ing from a 190 model. We don’t know if this big air fil­ter is bet­ter than the stock one but it cer­tainly works well! The ig­ni­tion is elec­tronic, an Elec­trex­world unit to be ex­act, which runs well with no more prob­lems like those we have ex­pe­ri­enced with the orig­i­nal FEMSA units. It may not per­form as well as the orig­i­nal elec­tron­ics but the erad­i­ca­tion of any prob­lems with the electrics has to be a bonus.

Justyn Norek Jnr: “With Bul­taco dom­i­nat­ing the World Cham­pi­onship from 1975 – Martin Lamp­kin (GBR); 1976/77/78: Yrjo Ves­ter­i­nen (FIN) and 1979: Bernie Schreiber (USA), this was the ma­chine to own in these years. It very much has a ‘World Cham­pi­ons’ feel to the ma­chine and, de­spite the age, it en­cour­ages you to push the lim­its of your rid­ing. The king of the ‘pivot turn’, Schreiber changed the tech­nique of rid­ing and many can ar­gue he started the trend to to­wards the mod­ern ‘trick’ rid­ing of to­day.”

The model 199A is bet­ter known as the ‘Blue Bul­taco’.

A Mikuni car­bu­ret­tor makes the char­ac­ter­is­tics of the power de­liv­ery softer com­pared with the Bing car­bu­ret­tor orig­i­nally fit­ted. It is also eas­ier to source Mikuni parts in or­der to set up the car­bu­re­tion to your own per­sonal re­quire­ments.

Much work has been done on the clutch sys­tem, with mod­i­fi­ca­tions car­ried out on the push rod and the clutch ro­tors/plates.

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