GLOBAL FU­SION

MI X THE OLD AND THE EXOT IC WI TH A NEW RE­STRAINED EL­E­GANCE, A S IN THI S PARISIAN ABODE

ELLE Decoration (UK) - - Content - Words TR­ISH LORENZ Pho­tog­ra­phy BIRGITTA WOLF­GANG/SIS­TERS AGENCY

The trend

Now is the time to throw away the rule­book and em­brace in­te­rior de­sign’s new motto: any­thing goes. We call this look ‘cul­tural fu­sion’: it’s all about buy­ing the pieces that you love (re­gard­less of their style or prove­nance), and ar­rang­ing them as con­sid­ered vignettes within a sim­ple, pared-back space. The re­sult is an orig­i­nal and con­tem­po­rary scheme, brim­ming with per­son­al­ity.

It is an aes­thetic that Ma­rina Co­ri­asco, an art di­rec­tor and co-founder of pop-up in­te­ri­ors shop Float­ing House Col­lec­tion, has per­fected in her Parisian abode. She first spot­ted this 250 -square-me­tre ware­house, which she shares with her 24-year-old son El­liot and 10-year-old daugh­ter Daria, in the peace­ful sub­urb of Cachan 15 years ago. Back then, it was derelict and unloved. Now, fol­low­ing a 12-month ren­o­va­tion project and a decade of trav­el­ling, it is a mod­ern home that’s both el­e­gant and ex­otic.

The apart­ment

You en­ter the loft through wide, re­claimed wooden doors into the 80-square-me­tre liv­ing room ( left), which is the heart of the apart­ment. Orig­i­nal metal rafters, painted black in stark con­trast to the white walls, ceil­ing and floors, frame the high ceil­ings. To the left of the en­trance is the bath­room and kitchen, which both open to the small gar­den. Sit­u­ated at the far end of the liv­ing room are three bed­rooms and an of­fice. ‘I could have had more rooms, but I wanted to cre­ate a big, cen­tral liv­ing area in­stead,’ says Ma­rina.

The pal­ette

The apart­ment is clean and spare, with a mono­chrome colour scheme and ma­te­ri­als such as steel and re­claimed wood – clas­sic com­po­nents of loft liv­ing. But here, those ba­sic el­e­ments are lay­ered with fur­nish­ings from dif­fer­ent eras and with var­ied styles. Ma­rina’s se­cret is to re­strict the colour pal­ette, us­ing only a few ac­cent pieces in muted, nat­u­ral tones. ‘Ma­te­ri­als are very im­por­tant to me. I like things to be raw and nat­u­ral: un­fin­ished woods and sim­ple ce­ram­ics,’ she says. ‘I don’t like too much colour ei­ther – just a touch. Wall hues of­ten bore me af­ter a few months and I have to change them, so now I like to add in­ter­est us­ing ac­ces­sories, such as cush­ions.’

The fur­nish­ings

Ma­rina com­bines heir­loom trea­sures, re­claimed pieces, found ob­jects and fab­rics and fur­ni­ture from her trav­els to cre­ate a scheme that fuses cul­tures and styles. ‘I’m at­tracted to mod­ern, pure and min­i­mal spa­ces, but I can’t al­ways achieve them be­cause I like ob­jects too much,’ she says. ‘I’m Ital­ian, but I was born in South Africa and I’ve al­ways trav­elled ex­ten­sively. I love Tu­lum in Mex­ico, In­dia, Africa and Costa Rica. When­ever I go some­where over­seas, I al­ways buy some­thing to bring back for the house.’

One of the rea­sons this apart­ment feels so in­di­vid­ual is that Ma­rina chooses to es­chew the ob­vi­ous in search of the more un­usual in­te­ri­ors finds – from the pale cream hand­made paper vases she brought back from a re­cent trip to In­dia to the cush­ions she’s had made from Pales­tinian kef­fiyeh (a che­quered black-and -white scarf ) fab­ric. She’s picky about what she buys lo­cally, too. ‘I al­ways take my time to find the right thing. I rarely buy some­thing just be­cause I need it right at that mo­ment,’ she says.

Por­trait Home­owner Ma­rina in front of a side­board in­her­ited from her grand­mother Liv­ing room The grey linen sofa is from Merci, and the green silk throw is from In­dia (avail­able from Float­ing House Col­lec­tion). For a vin­tage Eames lounger and ot­toman, try 1st Dibs. Sim­i­lar sus­pended fire­places are avail­able at Fo­cus Stock­ist de­tails on p152 ➤

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.