MY WORLD: CLAIRE THOM­SON-JONVILLE

ELLE EX­PLORES the LIFE, STYLE and MAI­SON of CREATIVE CON­SUL­TANT CLAIRE THOM­SON-JONVILLE

ELLE (UK) - - Contents - Words by ALICE CAVANAGH

The fash­ion ed­i­tor wel­comes us into her Parisian home

VERY FEW PARISIANS can­claim­to­liveinan ac­tual house. I’ve seen my fair share of apart­ments and lofts, but never a house with its very own front door. Un­til now. Claire Thom­son-Jonville, the Scot­tish creative con­sul­tant, former ed­i­tor-in-chief of high­glam­our cult mag­a­zine Self Ser­vice, and 37-year-old mother of two, is one such lucky res­i­dent. She lives in a charm­ing three-storey mai­son that she stum­bled across on a real-es­tate web­site — ‘A house, in the 8th ar­rondisse­ment!’ she says, still with a trace of dis­be­lief. It sits in a quiet court­yard, by a block of Hauss­man­nian apart­ments not far from the Champs-Élysées.

When we meet, Thom­son-Jonville has been here only a few months, but she’s nicely set­tled in. The floors — a mix of mar­ble and wooden par­quet — are warmed by Ber­ber rugs she found in Morocco, while a new, invit­ingly sprawl-wor­thy li­nen sofa from Merci (a bou­tique in Paris’s cool quar­ter, Le Marais) lines one side of her liv­ing room. Prints by pho­tog­ra­phers Juer­gen Teller and David Sims (reg­u­lars on the Self Ser­vice mast­head) hang on the walls, along with iconic im­agery by Cor­rine Day (in­clud­ing the end­lessly In­sta­grammed black-and-white por­trait of a young Kate Moss). Her book­shelves are chock-a-block with care­fully cu­rated back-is­sues of mag­a­zines, and the sur­faces are art­fully clut­tered with Byredo can­dles and stacked Her­mès boxes. ‘I have an eye for still life,’ Thom­son-Jonville says jok­ingly, in an ac­cent that can only be de­scribed as ‘in­ter­na­tional’ with a slight Scot­tish lilt. ‘It comes out more when I’m with my par­ents, but I’ve lived in a lot of places; it re­ally changes de­pend­ing on where I am,’ she ex­plains.

Al­most ev­ery­thing is in its place. But she’s still keep­ing an eye out for a vin­tage mir­ror and cof­fee ta­ble. ‘My to-do list on my phone is lit­er­ally “buy fur­ni­ture”, but I wanted to live in the space, and then start buy­ing things,’ she says. ‘But I have no time!’ This year has been one of change for Thom­sonJonville: along with the new ad­dress, she left her post at Self Ser­vice af­ter ten years to break out on her own as a free­lance creative con­sul­tant. First up is her re­cent col­lab­o­ra­tion with Parisian tai­lor­ing brand Pal­las on a de­but col­lec­tion of 11 looks. She’s cur­rently work­ing on part two, which is to be pre­sented dur­ing fash­ion week in Oc­to­ber.

“THIS IS THE HOME of A WOMAN WHO WORKS in FASH­ION – SURE of HER STYLE FROM

an EARLY AGE”

Though Thom­son-Jonville opened the door to­day wear­ing denim cut-offs and a white tank top — it’s 3O-plus de­grees in Paris, af­ter all — these days, her walk-in wardrobe is dom­i­nated by a num­ber of well-cut suits. ‘I’ve been hav­ing my suits made at Pal­las for a few years now, so we de­vel­oped the Claire suit: a sin­gle-but­ton jacket that you wear open, and a mas­cu­line trouser that I al­ways wear with sneak­ers,’ she says, adding defini­tively: ‘That’s the look.’

When it comes to train­ers, she has more than 3O pairs stashed in her home, and is a de­voted fan of Nike (the Off-White x Nike Air Jor­dan styles are cur­rently on high ro­ta­tion). There are also mono­grammed pouches and the odd fash­ion blan­ket spread through the house — one, by Her­mès, art­fully folded in the bath­room, and an­other green throw by Cé­line chucked over the ban­nis­ter (which is much loved by both her three-yearold daugh­ter Ge­or­gia and 18month-old son Éti­enne).

Make no mis­take, this is the home of a woman who works in fash­ion, and Thom­sonJonville has been sure of her style from an early age. ‘I re­mem­ber my mum tak­ing me to Joseph and I would be very spe­cific: I’d get a pair of black trousers and the same trousers in grey. I did have a boho mo­ment at one point — but we all did, right?’ she laughs.

At week­ends, her pace slows sig­nif­i­cantly and she seeks out fam­ily time, head­ing to the ‘Jardin des Tui­leries and Parc Mon­ceau,’ she says, reel­ing off a list of nearby green spa­ces. While she rarely has time to cook (‘I just can’t be both­ered,’ she says, with re­fresh­ing frank­ness), she clearly rel­ishes down time at home. When she’s not trav­el­ling for photo shoots or fash­ion weeks, she says it’s moth­er­hood that gives her per­spec­tive. ‘You can get all dressed up for an event, but if you’re dodg­ing choco­late fin­gers, you can’t not be grounded,’ she laughs. Or as you could say, a house (no mat­ter how rare) is not a home with­out some­one to make a mess with.

“A SINGLEBUTTON JACKET AND

a MAS­CU­LINE TROUSER with SNEAK­ERS. THAT’S

the LOOK”

ELLE OC­TO­BER

THE CLAS­SICS Prints from noted pho­tog­ra­phers,in­clud­ing Juer­gen Teller,fea­ture in the house

READ­ING LISTCult style ti­tles in­clud­ing Self Ser­vice, the mag­a­zine Claire editedun­til 2O18

PACK­INGESSEN­TIALS For­ever on the move, Claire al­ways has a holdall ready to go

WARDROBESTA­PLES A clas­sic suitis Claire’s sig­na­ture, such as those she’s de­signed withPal­las PER­SONALTOUCH The house isfilled with snap­shots of Claire’s twochil­dren

THEFRA­GRANCESTom Ford per­fumes and pil­lar can­dles dou­ble as chicstill-lifes

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