Bizarre his­tory of... Queen’s park

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PASS­ING GROOVE

Queen’s Park in­vented pass­ing foot­ball. “They drib­ble lit­tle, con­vey­ing the ball by a series of long kicks com­bined with a ju­di­cious plan of pass­ing,” The Field wrote af­ter the 1872 FA Cup semi-fi­nal draw with Wan­der­ers.

AT THE DOU­BLE

In 1884 the club came very close to se­cur­ing a unique dou­ble, af­ter Queen’s Park be­came the only Scot­tish side to reach the FA Cup fi­nal. They won the Scot­tish Cup but then lost 2-1 to Black­burn in Ken­ning­ton.

FIRST MIN­IS­TER

Goal­keeper Mustafa Man­sour – ‘The Fly­ing Egyp­tian’ – re­jected Celtic for the Spi­ders in 1936. He’d starred at the World Cup two years ear­lier for Egypt (led by a Scot in James Mcrea) and went on to be­come a cab­i­net min­is­ter in the ’60s.

BIT­TEN BY THE BUG

Alex Fer­gu­son’s de­but for Queen’s Park was event­ful. The teenager scored in a 2-1 de­feat to Stran­raer in 1958 and was bit­ten by an op­po­nent. His coach told Fergie to man up at half-time, with the ad­vice: “Bite him back!”

MADE OF SAND

Ian Dur­rant (be­low) snubbed a move to the Spi­ders af­ter he saw play­ers run­ning up sand dunes. “He was at Ham­p­den for two nights,” said le­gendary boss Ed­die Hunter. “The sec­ond to say chee­rio.”

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