YEL­LOW AND RED CARDS

If ref­eree Ken As­ton (right) hadn’t gone for a drive in 1966, cau­tions could have been com­mu­ni­cated us­ing smoke sig­nal. Or some­thing...

FourFourTwo - - ACTION REPLAY -

LIGHT­ING IT UP

Af­ter Ar­gentina cap­tain An­to­nio Rat­tin was con­tro­ver­sially sent off against Eng­land at the 1966 World Cup, and con­fu­sion over whether Jack Charl­ton had got booked, ref­eree chief Ken As­ton had a brain­wave while stuck at a set of traf­fic lights in Lon­don.

“WAIT THERE, KEN…”

“As the light turned red,” As­ton – who had of­fi­ci­ated the Bat­tle of San­ti­ago be­tween Italy and Chile in 1962 – later ex­plained, “I thought, ‘Yel­low, take it easy; red, stop, you’re off’.” Once he was back home, his wife Hilda cut out two bits of card for him.

GREET­INGS, CARDS

Foot­ball had to wait four years for the in­tro­duc­tion of the card sys­tem, at the 1970 World Cup. So­viet Union de­fender Evgeny Lovchev was shown the game’s first ever yel­low card af­ter only 40 min­utes of the tour­na­ment opener with host na­tion Mex­ico.

RED-FACED FA

English foot­ball didn’t em­brace cards un­til 1976, but in Jan­uary 1981 the FA did away with red ones, be­liev­ing “de­mon­stra­tive ref­er­ees” were con­tribut­ing to an in­crease in vi­o­lence on and off the field. FIFA re­versed the “out of step” de­ci­sion in 1987.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.