NEEDA FES­TIVE DECOR UP­DATE?

Ring­ing out the same Christ­mas dec­o­ra­tions year on year may be a fam­ily tra­di­tion but is it time to start a new one?

Harefield Gazette - - HOME STYLE -

The clocks have gone back, Hal­loween is but a dim and dis­tant mem­ory and the last sparks of Bon­fire Night have been ex­tin­guished, bar the odd rogue fire­work or two.

Which can only mean one thing: Christ­mas is com­ing and it will soon be time to haul down the decades­old Christ­mas dec­o­ra­tions from the loft and place them in the ex­actly the same spot as ev­ery pre­vi­ous year. Well, not quite. Like all sea­sons, this most fes­tive of times is set to bring with it new in­te­rior trends which are bold, beau­ti­ful and sure to im­press. And while you may not wish to part with your cu­rated sea­sonal stash, en­riched ev­ery year with sen­ti­men­tal trin­kets, a few key ad­di­tions here and there will bring your fes­tive look bang on trend.

THE MOD­ERN CLAS­SIC

One of my favourite things about styling my home for Christ­mas is com­bin­ing old and new dec­o­ra­tions.

Older dec­o­ra­tions are steeped in tra­di­tion, giv­ing them a unique charm that is hard to match. But some will need re­plac­ing.

So let’s turn to our old friends the Scan­di­na­vians who reign supreme when com­bin­ing sen­ti­men­tal dec­o­ra­tions with mod­ern ad­di­tions.

This sea­son, Scan­di­na­vian-in­spired dec­o­ra­tions are typ­i­fied by muted shades of taupe and blue, which will bring mod­ern yet clas­sic styling to your Christ­mas dec­o­ra­tions re­sult­ing in a time­less fin­ish. And be lib­eral with them. Pom poms, baubles and dec­o­ra­tions draped from the ceil­ing are all per­fectly ac­cept­able, just keep colours to a min­i­mum and make sure the shades you use com­ple­ment each other.

RETRO CHIC

Hands up if you re­mem­ber Christ­mas in the 80s?

It was fab­u­lous – swathes of colour­ful tin­sel masked trees while fes­tive bunt­ing made from brightly coloured foil hung ceil­ing to ceil­ing.

And while this Christ­mas may not be a re­turn to the full-on fes­tive glam­our of the 80s, an homage to the era will emerge.

Brightly coloured baubles, lus­cious tin­sel and metal­lic or­na­ments are all mak­ing a come­back; think clash­ing colours, pops of neon and glit­ter by the tonne to com­plete this in­dul­gent, op­u­lent look.

On a tight bud­get? Get cre­ative. Give old baubles a new lease of life with some PVA glue and a few tubes of glit­ter; or why not hunt around sec­ond-hand or an an­tique shop for some pre-loved gen­uine 80s dec­o­ra­tions.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Cen­tre­pieces are an es­sen­tial part of my Christ­mas dé­cor – I have one on my din­ing ta­ble through­out the sea­son.

And it re­ally is that, a cen­tre­piece around which we all gather; be it a fam­ily din­ner, a Christ­mas Eve take­away or the main event it­self, Christ­mas lunch.

Whether you de­cide to make your own or buy one, choose a cen­tre­piece that com­ple­ments not only your Christ­mas colours but the room in which it will be placed.

If your home has a more min­i­mal­ist vibe, a fussy cen­tre­piece will look im­me­di­ately out of place. How­ever, a mod­ern one won’t nec­es­sar­ily work in a tra­di­tional dé­cor.

And for me, the only es­sen­tial is a can­dle or two (the more the bet­ter). Can­dles and Christ­mas go hand in hand and will also cre­ate an in­ti­mate at­mos­phere for those fes­tive meals to­gether.

If you’re short on in­spi­ra­tion, time or money, a few can­dles of vary­ing height brought to­gether on a nice plate will work per­fectly.

Les­ley Tay­lor is the au­thor of 10 in­te­rior de­sign books and has ap­peared on a range of net­work TV shows, in­clud­ing This Morn­ing, giv­ing in­spi­ra­tional ad­vice on home styling.

She is the founder and de­sign di­rec­tor of lux­ury in­te­ri­ors life­style store Tay­lors Etc.

Cen­tre­pieces are per­fect for bring­ing every­one to­gether. If you feel par­tic­u­larly cre­ative why not craft your own?

The tin­sel-tas­tic 80s will be in­flu­enc­ing this year’s trends

For­get minimalism, op­u­lence is back

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