FANNY DUBERLY

History of War - - CRIMEAN WAR -

THE DI­ARIST WHO RECORDED A UNIQUE FE­MALE PER­SPEC­TIVE OF LIFE ON THE FRONT LINE 1829-1902 GREAT BRI­TAIN

Born in Wilt­shire, Eng­land, Duberly (née Locke) mar­ried Lieu­tenant Henry Duberly in 1850 and ac­com­pa­nied him to the Crimea on the out­break of war. Her hus­band was pro­moted to cap­tain and acted as the pay­mas­ter for the 8th Royal Ir­ish Hus­sars. Duberly ig­nored or­ders for wives to be ex­cluded from the war zone and wit­nessed many bat­tles, in­clud­ing the Charge of the

Light Brigade and the Bat­tle of Malakoff. She shared her hus­band’s hut in the brigade lines, ex­pe­ri­enced win­ter pri­va­tions and rode into Sev­astopol soon af­ter it fell.

Duberly recorded all of these events in a daily diary that was no­table for its de­tail and self­con­fi­dence, with an of­ten blunt and sober­ing tone. Large ex­tracts were sold in a best­selling book called Jour­nal Kept Dur­ing The Rus­sian War.

Its wil­ful­ness and lack of heroic ro­man­ti­cism of­fended some read­ers, in­clud­ing Queen Vic­to­ria who re­fused to write a ded­i­ca­tion. Duberly went on to ac­com­pany her hus­band to In­dia where she wrote an­other book be­fore they re­tired to Chel­tenham in the 1880s.

Duberly pho­tographed on horse­back in the Crimea, 1855

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.