Ap­ple iPhone X

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iPad&iPhone user - - CONTENTS -

It’s 10 years since Steve Jobs un­veiled the first iPhone and Ap­ple has marked the oc­ca­sion with a new hand­set that doesn’t just jump one gen­er­a­tion, it jumps sev­eral. The firm has leaped straight from iPhone

7 (via the iPhone 8) all the way to iPhone X, by­pass­ing the iPhone 7s and leapfrog­ging the iPhone 9 al­to­gether.

De­spite ru­mours of lim­ited stock, thou­sands of peo­ple queued around blocks the world over to pick up the new hand­set, in scenes we haven’t seen for a few years. All Ap­ple had to do to get so much at­ten­tion was redesign the iPhone. That sounds easy, but the redesign in­volved the re­moval of the Home but­ton, and to make that pos­si­ble Ap­ple had to re­think the way you in­ter­act with the phone.

Face ID

The iPhone X fea­ture that’s re­ceived the most at­ten­tion is Face ID, Ap­ple’s tech­nol­ogy for un­lock­ing the iPhone X and au­then­ti­cat­ing your ID. It re­places Touch ID, Ap­ple’s fin­ger­print tech­nol­ogy that served the same pur­pose.

Set­ting it up is easy. In a process sim­i­lar to Touch ID, where the Home but­ton records sev­eral im­pres­sions of your fin­ger­prints, the you’ll need to move your head in dif­fer­ent an­gles as the TrueDepth cam­era sys­tem records dif­fer­ent spots on your face. It takes a few min­utes, and then it’s ready to go.

Face ID only al­lows a sin­gle per­son to reg­is­ter

their face. Touch ID lets you reg­is­ter dif­fer­ent fin­gers; you can use this ca­pac­ity to reg­is­ter the fin­ger­prints of other peo­ple who you want to have ac­cess to your de­vice. This is handy if you’re okay with, say, your other half hav­ing ac­cess to your iPhone. Maybe Face ID’s one-face lim­i­ta­tion will change if Ap­ple de­cides to use Face ID on the iPad, a de­vice that’s more likely to have mul­ti­ple users.

By de­fault, Face ID re­quires your eyes to be open in or­der for it to work, But if you go into Set­tings > Face ID & Pass­code and turn off the Re­quire At­ten­tion for Face ID set­ting, Face ID will work when you have your eyes closed.

I had some con­cerns about Face ID be­cause I’ve got so used to Touch ID, which feels like it has seam­lessly in­te­grated with how I use my iPhone. But for me, there was ac­tu­ally noth­ing to re­ally be con­cerned about. Face ID is much closer to the idea of seam­less in­te­gra­tion than I imag­ined with Touch ID.

When it works, Face ID works re­ally well. To ac­cess your iPhone X after it’s been sit­ting in your pocket, purse, bag, desk, and so on, you need to un­lock it us­ing Face ID. At first, I had a ten­dency to wait for the lock icon on the screen to un­lock. But the key is to not wait. You should swipe up to get to the Home screen as you’re look­ing at the iPhone X. It takes some prac­tice, but be­fore too long, un­lock­ing your phone will feel ef­fort­less.

I’ve had some con­ver­sa­tions with An­droid users who have tried the iPhone X, and their main beef with Face ID is that it’s too slow com­pared to a fin­ger­print scan­ner. In their lim­ited time with the iPhone X, they’re not ac­cess­ing the Home screen in the man­ner I de­scribed above – and since they’re not in­vested in the iPhone, they’re not will­ing to learn, ei­ther. It’s still true that ac­cess to the Home screen us­ing Face ID isn’t as fast as us­ing a fin­ger­print scan­ner, but it’s maybe a sec­ond slower. If that one sec­ond is all the dif­fer­ence to you, then I hope you’re us­ing that time wisely.

Us­ing Face ID with some third-party apps is done in a man­ner sim­i­lar to that of Touch ID. For ex­am­ple, with the app for my bank and with

Set­ting up Face ID is easy and takes a cou­ple of min­utes

By de­fault, Face ID re­quires your eyes to be open in or­der for it to work, But if you go into Set­tings > Face ID & Pass­code and turn off the Re­quire At­ten­tion for Face ID set­ting, Face ID will work when you have your eyes closed

Third-party apps such as Dropbox have up­dated its apps with Face ID sup­port

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