RAY OF THINK­ING

Men's Health (UK) - - The Body Issue -

Some lunchtime sun can halve your risk of early men­tal de­cline. Pass the SPF, please

At this time of year, you may ob­serve an in­crease in our cham­pi­oning of a cer­tain scin­til­lat­ing vi­ta­min. With ben­e­fits per­tain­ing to ev­ery­thing from fat loss to can­cer pre­ven­tion, vi­ta­min D en­joys its fair share of time in the sun. But should you re­quire any ex­tra en­cour­age­ment to stray from the shade this sum­mer, the bright sparks at Chongqing Med­i­cal Univer­sity in China have un­cov­ered fur­ther re­search cur­rently burn­ing up the health newswires.

In a study of 400 vol­un­teers, half of whom were re­cently di­ag­nosed with Parkin­son’s, neu­rol­o­gists noted sig­nif­i­cantly lower lev­els of the vi­ta­min in the blood of those af­flicted when mea­sured against a com­par­a­tively healthy con­trol group.

Fur­ther study showed that those who spent in ex­cess of 14 hours a week ex­posed to sun­light – just two hours a day – were only half as likely to de­velop the con­di­tion as those who spent seven hours or less out­doors.

Though you can find vit D in food, as much as 80% of our lev­els are dic­tated by sun ex­po­sure, mak­ing a lunchtime park work­out dur­ing the warmer months all the more worth­while if you’re keen to stave off neu­ro­log­i­cal de­cline in the long-run. Not our most in­stantly grat­i­fy­ing of of­fers? Your healthy glow sug­gests oth­er­wise.

SOAK UP SOME RAYS TO GIVE YOUR BRAIN A BRIGHTER OUT­LOOK

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