FART­ING COWS BRING DOWN HEATHROW PLANE

Fart­ing cow brings down plane over Heathrow

Midweek Sport - - FRONT PAGE - By SIMON DEAN simon@sun­daysport.co.uk

A FRAN­TIC pi­lot made a may­day call and dived into an emer­gency land­ing – be­cause FART­ING COWS made him be­lieve his plane was about to go up in flames.

The Korean Air­ways 747 freighter car­ry­ing 390 cows was en route from Chicago O’Hare air­port to Brus­sels when the fire alarm blared over the Ir­ish Sea.

Fear­ing his plane was about to be­come a 400ton fire­ball, the pi­lot and his crew pulled on oxy­gen masks and made a may­day call to air traf­fic con­trol at Heathrow.

Air traf­fic con­trollers cleared their air lanes of traf­fic, al­low­ing the Korean pi­lot a clear run to make an emer­gency plunge to­wards ground.

It was only later that the pi­lot found the fire alert had been trig­gered by hu­mid­ity caused by the cows’ no­to­ri­ous­lyflat­u­lent ar­ses.

An ac­count of the emer­gency was re­leased by the Civil Avi­a­tion Author­ity and pub­lished on the Avi­a­tion Her­ald web­site.

A source said: “A wor­ried crew mem­ber was sent onto the main deck to in­ves­ti­gate but saw no sign of smoke or fire.

“But fol­low­ing pro­ce­dure they donned oxy­gen masks and started ‘a con­trolled cabin de­pres­suri­sa­tion and rapid de­scent’ – an emer­gency land­ing, if you will.

Hu­mid­ity

“Af­ter ex­ten­sive checks on the air­craft, the pi­lot said he be­lieved that the pres­ence of the cat­tle led to higher lev­els of hu­mid­ity on board.”

The Korean Air­ways land­ing at Heathrow is one of 88 may­day calls re­ported to the Civil Avi­a­tion Author­ity (CAA) last year.

A may­day land­ing is the high­est level of emer­gency and is rarely used ex­cept in the most ur­gent cases.

Other rea­sons for us­ing the in­ter­na­tional dis­tress sig­nal have in­cluded low fuel lev­els, sus­pected ter­ror­ism and crew mem­bers be­ing struck down with food poi­son­ing and be­com­ing un­able to safely man the plane.

Moo­day! Moo­day!

PULL MY

HOOF!

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.