If you’ve been see­ing a physio for weeks but are still none the wiser about what’s wrong with you, read on…

Runner's World (UK) - - Injury -

FIRST THINGS FIRST

‘A good prac­ti­tioner will want ex­ten­sive de­tails of your cur­rent in­jury and any pre­vi­ous ones,’ says run­ning physio Mark Buck­ing­ham (wpb­physio.co.uk).

THE AS­SESS­MENT

Be­ware any phys­i­cal as­sess­ment that fo­cuses solely on the area that hurts. ‘Joints and tis­sues above and be­low it [also] need to be as­sessed, both pas­sively and in move­ment,’ says Buck­ing­ham.

WHAT’S NEXT?

Af­ter the as­sess­ment, the physio should talk you through their find­ings. ‘You need a clear un­der­stand­ing of what the prob­lem is and why it has oc­curred,’ says Buck­ing­ham. Make sure you leave armed with a plan of ac­tion or, if nec­es­sary, on­ward re­fer­ral.

OVER TO YOU

Get pa­per doc­u­men­ta­tion (or video footage) of any ex­er­cises, along with reps, sets and fre­quency. ‘You should also have guid­ance on the amount of run­ning and cross-train­ing you can do,’ advises Ali­son Rose from Coach House Phys­io­ther­apy in Leeds (cspc.co.uk).

LIFE SEN­TENCE?

‘You shouldn’t be go­ing back for ap­point­ments week af­ter week for months with­out big im­prove­ments,’ adds Rose. ‘I would want to see a change within three ses­sions; five, max, for a com­plex prob­lem.’

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