Fox warn­ing

Rutherglen Reformer - - Front Page - Mur­ray Spooner

A Ruther­glen woman at­tacked by a rogue fox has warned fel­low res­i­dents of the dan­gers the an­i­mal can cause.

Lynn Gra­ham, 51, was visit­ing a friend on Reid Court on Fri­day, Oc­to­ber 7, when she was ap­proached by the ‘brazen’ mutt.

A Ruther­glen woman at­tacked by a rogue fox has warned fel­low res­i­dents of the dan­gers the an­i­mal can cause.

Lynn Gra­ham, 51, was visit­ing a friend on Reid Court on Fri­day, Oc­to­ber 7 when she was ap­proached by the ‘brazen’ mutt.

The mother of one, was ad­mir­ing it from the door step be­fore the an­i­mal struck and bit her an­kle.

But to Lynn’s luck, she was wear­ing high length boots which pro­tected her from the fox’s bite.

“It was about 11.30pm and we were stand­ing hav­ing a cig­a­rette watch­ing this fox,” said Lynn who stays on nearby Fraser Av­enue.

“The fox came round and I was wish­ing I had my phone to take a photo. It was go­ing from one side to the other.

“It was quite big, brazen and was sniff­ing around. It was won­der­ing about and I thought it was lovely.

“I was just say­ing to my pal that we should have fed it some­thing and the next thing I knew, it went for me. I got the fright of my life.

“It came right in at my heel and went for my an­kles. I never thought it would do some­thing like that.

“I was lucky I had my high leather boots and not my slip­pers on. It wasn’t sore be­cause its teeth just bit into the leather.”

Foxes, par­tic­u­larly red foxes, are com­mon in hu­man-pop­u­lated ar­eas and res­i­dents have been known to feed the an­i­mals which fre­quent their area.

But in gen­eral, foxes are not often as­so­ci­ated as dan­ger­ous to hu­mans or some pets and at­tacks are not a com­mon oc­cur­rence.

They are likely to feed off live­stock that is small such as poul­try, rab­bits or other small new­born an­i­mals.

And de­spite the vast ma­jor­ity of foxes not pre­sent­ing a risk to the pub­lic, Scot­tish SPCA chief su­per­in­ten­dent Mike Flynn has ad­vised peo­ple to leave them alone.

He said: “Un­like the wild fox, ur­ban foxes are born and bred in our towns and cities and are fa­mil­iar with the sights and sounds as­so­ci­ated with liv­ing close to peo­ple.

“The ur­ban fox is a com­mon vis­i­tor to gar­dens, par­tic­u­larly if there is a food source present. We would rec­om­mend that peo­ple don’t en­cour­age foxes to their gar­dens by leav­ing food out for them and en­sure rub­bish is kept in an en­closed bin.

“Any­one with small pets should re­move them from runs and keep them se­cure in a hutch overnight.”

Fol­low­ing her fright­en­ing or­deal, Lynn urged fel­low res­i­dents to be on their guard and warned of the dan­gers the an­i­mal could cause to young chil­dren.

She said: “I just want to warn peo­ple to be aware. I was think­ing of some­body young who could be at risk.

“Many peo­ple feed them round here and that’s maybe why they are com­ing round.”

At­tack Lynn Gra­ham holds the boot which pro­tected her from the an­i­mal’s bite

Wild Res­i­dents have been warned to stay away from foxes in their neigh­bour­hood

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