Sec­ond World War fallen

The Courier & Advertiser (Fife Edition) - - NEWS -

● John Gra­ham: Con­sta­ble Gra­ham was the son of John (en­gine driver) and Mar­garet Gra­ham of 67 Oliver Park, Haw­ick, Roxburghshire.

Con­sta­ble Gra­ham was sin­gle and had been a hosiery ware­house­man prior to join­ing the po­lice ser­vice.

He left the po­lice ser­vice to join the Royal Air Force Vol­un­teer Re­serve in Au­gust 1941.

● Alan Tay­lor: Con­sta­ble Tay­lor was born in St Machar, Aberdeen, and was the son of Mr. John Alan Tay­lor (innkeeper) and Mag­gie Hamil­ton Tay­lor, of Carnoustie. He was a keen golfer and dux at school.

Prior to join­ing the po­lice ser­vice, Tay­lor was a clerk. On Au­gust 19, 1942, he left the po­lice ser­vice and saw ac­tive ser­vice with the Cameron High­landers.

● RobertBoslem:Con­sta­bleBoslemwas­born­inStir­ling and was the son of Thomas Boslem and Agnes Boslem (nee Sned­don).

He was mar­ried to Mar­ion Cameron Boslem (nee Gunn) and reside­dat31BeachCres­cent,BroughtyFerry. Boslem was a plumber prior to join­ing the po­lice ser­vice. He left the po­lice ser­vice on Au­gust 19, 1942 and saw ac­tive ser­vice with the Cameron High­landers.

He at­tained the rank of lieu­tenant prior to be­ing taken pris­oner and later died in a Ger­man camp hos­pi­tal.

● John Mac­Gre­gor: Con­sta­ble Mac­Gre­gor was the son of John and An­nie Mac­Gre­gor. He was mar­ried to Mar­garet and resided in Dundee. Con­sta­ble Mac­Gre­gor was a na­tive of Glas­gow and was a sales­man be­fore join­ing the po­lice ser­vice.

He passed his po­lice pro­mo­tion exam for pro­mo­tion to sergeant on Fe­bru­ary 14, 1939 and for in­spec­tor on Fe­bru­ary 11, 1941.

On June 24 1942 Mac­Gre­gor left the po­lice ser­vice to join the Royal Air Force Vol­un­teer Re­serve where he be­came a pi­lot. On June 10, 1944 RAF records in­di­cate that Con­sta­ble Mac­Gre­gor was “killed on ac­tive ser­vice – ac­ci­dent to air­craft.”

● Robert Wood­house: Con­sta­ble Wood­house was the son ofWil­liamKWood­house(en­gi­neer)andEl­iz­a­bethBeck Wood­house, of 65 High Street, John­stone, Ren­frew­shire. He was un­mar­ried. He was a mem­ber of the Po­lice War Re­serve in Ren­frew­shire (21.11.40 – 24.5.41) prior to join­ing the po­lice ser­vice in Dundee.

On July 15, 1942, Wood­house left the po­lice ser­vice to serve with the Royal Air Force Vol­un­teer Re­serve (218 Squadron) as a pi­lot of­fi­cer (air gun­ner). On Septem­ber 23, 1943, Con­sta­ble Wood­house was one of a crew of seven fly­ing in a Stir­ling Mark 3 bomber (num­ber EJ104). Sched­uled to at­tack Man­heim in Ger­many as part of a squadron of 12 bombers, Con­sta­ble Wood­house’s air­craft took off from RAF Down­ham Mar­ket at 1925 hours. On Septem­ber 23, 1943 records in­di­cate that he was “miss­ing pre­sumed dead”.

● Colin Men­zies: Men­zies was na­tive to Scoonie, Fife and was the son of Thomas B. Men­zies (clerk) and Cather­ine Men­zies. He joined the po­lice ser­vice on De­cem­ber 26, 1933 as a 19-year-old for­mer stu­dent.

Con­sta­ble Men­zies passed his po­lice exam for pro­mo­tion to sergeant on July 8, 1938. On June 25, 1942 he left the po­lice ser­vice to serve with the Royal Air Force Vol­un­teer Re­serve as a sergeant (air bomber).

● Ge­orge Law­son: Con­sta­ble Law­son was born in Ed­in­burgh and was the son of Alexan­der Small Law­son (school­mas­ter) and Frances Anne Hall Law­son (nee Simp­son) of North Ber­wick, East Loth­ian.

Prior to join­ing the po­lice, records in­di­cate that he was an ap­pren­tice elec­tri­cian and resided in St An­drews. Law­son was un­mar­ried.

He passed his po­lice pro­mo­tion exam to sergeant on Fe­bru­ary 14, 1939, but was un­suc­cess­ful in his exam for in­spec­tor on Fe­bru­ary 11, 1941.

On July 18 1941, Law­son left the po­lice ser­vice to serve with the Royal Air Force Vol­un­teer Re­serve as a fly­ing of­fi­cer (pi­lot).

● Robert Stir­rat: Born on Jan­uary 2, con­sta­ble Stir­rat was orig­i­nally from Kil­maurs, Ayr­shire, but grew up in Coat­bridge. Af­ter be­ing a stu­dent for a time he joined Dundee City Po­lice on Jan­uary 4, 1937 and was con­firmed on April 6, 1938. He proved to be a good ath­lete, com­pet­ing as a run­ner at many po­lice sports meet­ings.

He was mar­ried to Kath­leen and the cou­ple lived at 3 Boyd Place, Broughty Ferry.

On Mon­day, May 5, 1941 Stir­rat be­gan his shift at Broughty Ferry po­lice of­fice, and a short time later was called to in­ves­ti­gate a re­port of an “un­fa­mil­iar ob­ject” at Fisher Street.

Upon ap­proach­ing, he found the ob­ject to be a mine, and know­ing the ex­treme dan­ger they posed, he at­tempted to se­cure it to pre­vent it drift­ing back out to sea. Sud­denly, and with­out warn­ing, the mine ex­ploded, blow­ing off Stir­rat’s right arm and both legs be­low the knee as well as shat­ter­ing the win­dows of nearby houses.

He died, aged just 24, in Dundee Royal In­fir­mary at 3.16pm that af­ter­noon.

Dr. Chad­wick cer­ti­fied the cause of death as “mul­ti­ple lac­er­a­tions, com­pund frac­tures and shock .”

Ge­orge Law­son served as a pi­lot in the Royal Air Force Vol­un­teer Re­serve

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